Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 12, 2009
Harvard University has had notable success in recent years at attracting more students from low-income backgrounds. But even as the university offers generous aid packages that cover all official expenses, students without money find themselves in a series of awkward social and financial situations, The Boston Globe reported.
May 12, 2009
The District of Columbia agency that handles financial aid requests has just sent detailed information about 2,400 aid applicants to 1,250 of those applicants, The Washington Post reported. The office sent an e-mail to 1,250 applicants and accidentally attached a spreadsheet with 2,400 applicants' names, e-mail and home addresses, Social Security numbers, phone numbers and dates of birth.
May 12, 2009
New Jersey has been spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on a special Rutgers University appropriation that supported a small nonprofit group to teach school children how to grow food in space, The Star-Ledger reported. Given that space agriculture hasn't exactly taken off, the revelation was sure to be controversial, but the newspaper found that this appropriation featured a peculiat twist on the concept of the no-show job.
May 12, 2009
The volleyball coach at Quinnipiac University testified Monday that the institution has distorted athletic rosters as a means of hiding violations of gender equity laws, The Hartford Courant reported.
May 12, 2009
Big-time college football programs now have a pool from which to select minority coaches, according to a study published in USA Today. The study found that about 15 percent of offensive and defensive coordinators in the football bowl division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association are from minority groups. Those coordinator positions are traditionally the path to head coaching positions.
May 12, 2009
With anti-abortion groups continuing to criticize the University of Notre Dame's decision to have President Obama speak at graduation ceremonies, there was one commencement address the critics might like. The commencement speaker at Ave Maria University, which prides itself on strict adherence to Roman Catholic teachings, devoted time to denouncing Obama and Notre Dame.
May 11, 2009
The University of Wisconsin Board of Regents on Friday approved a plan to raise tuition at the flagship campus at Madison by substantial amounts, but to designate those funds for spending -- such as additional faculty slots -- that directly improves undergraduate education. Biddy Martin, the new chancellor at Madison, championed the plan -- and won student support for it -- by noting the many ways that inadequate state funding has hurt the student experience.
May 11, 2009
Officials at Shasta College places white poster board over a student's painting in an art exhibit, allowing those at the exhibit to lift up the board to view the painting, but hiding it from the view of those who don't take that step, The Redding Record Searchlight reported. The painting at the California college shows two young children, in the style of the Dick and Jane books, greeting a man in a bathrobe, which is open, exposing him in an aroused state.
May 11, 2009
The National Institutes of Health on Friday said it was considering issuing new regulations to govern financial and other conflicts of interest in biomedical research and invited interested parties to weigh in on a set of possible changes.
May 11, 2009
Craig Arnold, an award-winning poet and professor at the University of Wyoming, is believed to have died on a Japanese island. Arnold, who was fascinated by and wrote about volcanoes, set off on a hike on April 27 and never returned, prompting extensive search efforts. Poets and English professors at many campuses have been following the situation, and hoping for his safe return. A search group reported that he appeared to have fallen from a cliff from which there would have been no possibility of survival.

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