Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

May 20, 2009
In stark contrast to 2007, federal negotiations over accreditation rules end in accord, overcoming dispute over student learning outcomes that might have derailed the proceeding.
May 20, 2009
Brigham Young University's Idaho campus has shut down the student groups that back the Democratic and Republican parties, The Rexburg Standard Journal reported. University officials said that the move was designed to assure that the campus is seen as politically "neutral," but some students are complaining, noting that campus chapters of political parties are common at other institutions.
May 20, 2009
Rep. Howard P. "Buck" McKeon (R-Cal.) introduced legislation Tuesday that would address one, California-specific inequity in the funding formula under the new Post-9/11 GI Bill.
May 20, 2009
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy has been a major player in nearly every important piece of higher education legislation for at least the last two decades, and with Congress poised to take on a potentially enormous higher ed challenge -- President Obama's proposal to transform the Pell Grant and student loan programs -- the Massachusetts senator appears likely to be in the thick of things again.
May 19, 2009
The faculty union at Robert Morris University, in Pennsylvania, has agreed to cut the size of the raise it was assured under a contract for the next academic year so that the university can devote more money to financial aid. Under the contract, professors were to have received raises of 2.75 percent. But more than half of that total (1.45 percent of base salaries) will be given up, producing an extra $180,000 in scholarship funds. The union is an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers.
May 19, 2009
In the seven weeks that Stanford University has made available free videos of a course on applications for the iPhone and iPod, it has received more than 1 million downloads, the university announced. According to Apple, seven weeks is the fastest time ever for a course on iTunes U. to reach 1 million downloads.
May 19, 2009
The University of Illinois board will this week consider a plan to scale back the system's new online campus, which has been controversial from the start, amid disappointing enrollment results, the Chicago Tribune reported. The campus was designed to be largely free-standing, prompting complaints from professors about insufficient ties to academic departments.
May 19, 2009
The president of the University of North Carolina System and the chancellor of North Carolina State University have called on Mary Easley, wife of the former governor, to resign from a position at North Carolina State that has come to be seen as political patronage, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. Easley was hired to direct a speakers series, but was given additional duties and a five-year, $850,000 contract during a period of budget constraints at the university.
May 19, 2009
Career Education Corp. announced Monday that its American Intercontinental University subsidiary, which had regained approved status from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools after two years on probation, has been granted initial accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, another regional accreditor.
May 19, 2009
That depends largely on how you frame the question, says a new study -- which provides some intriguing answers nonetheless.

Pages

Back to Top