Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

February 23, 2009
Adjunct leaders from a variety of institutions and different parts of the country on Sunday formally agreed to create the National Coalition for Adjunct Equity, which will aim to be a new national voice for those off the tenure track. The co-chairs of the new group are Deborah Louis , who teache at Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College and Eastern Kentucky University, and Maria Maisto, who teaches at the University of Akron.
February 23, 2009
A guide to the changes and new features on the revamped Web site we are unveiling today.
February 23, 2009
The hot new trend in big-time college sports: Tap a key assistant as the head coach's eventual successor. Is that smart planning, does it diminish opportunity for minority candidates, or both?
February 23, 2009
Drafters of economic stimulus bill aimed to create jobs especially for men and the low skilled. But analysis finds that majority of new and saved jobs will require college-level training.
February 22, 2009
Alan Dershowitz continues to demand that Hampshire College do more to demonstrate that it has not adopted a policy of divesting all stocks tied to Israel -- and Hampshire College continues to tell Alan Dershowitz that he has his facts wrong. The controversy started when a pro-Palestinian student group announced that Hampshire had divested.
February 22, 2009
Michael Rao has been named president of Virginia Commonwealth University, which will be his fourth presidency. Rao is currently president of Central Michigan University, and previously led Montana State University-Northern and Mission College. E. Gordon Gee, of course, is the leader in presidencies, as his current run at Ohio State University (his second there) is his sixth presidency. But Rao could catch up -- he's 42, to Gee's 65.
February 22, 2009
Pacific Oaks College has announced that Carolyn Denham is resigning as president after 10 years in office. The California college, known for its innovative approaches to teacher education, has been struggling financially and considering closure. While Denham has pushed for more fiscal control, many students and professors have faulted her for not fully embracing the college's non-traditional spirit.
February 22, 2009
The Abdul Rao controversy continues at the University of South Florida. A videotape caught Rao, senior associate vice president of research, taking a bike that belonged to a graduate student from a university building. Rao maintained that he did nothing wrong, and was trying to loan the bike to a homeless friend. In exchange for $50,000, Rao quit his job. Now, Rao wants to rescind his resignation. The St.
February 22, 2009
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act is the exclusive legal mechanism available to public college employees for claims of age discrimination, a federal appeals court ruled Friday in a case involving the Nevada System of Higher Education. The U.S.
February 22, 2009
The Iowa Supreme Court on Friday ruled that a fraternity had the right to sue the University of Iowa for its use in a disciplinary hearing of a tape – made secretly and illegally – of hazing activities. But the court also reduced damages awarded by a lower court. The tape was made by a student who lived in the Phi Delta Theta house, but who was not a member of the fraternity.

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