Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

September 14, 2009
Pyongyang University of Science and Technology will open this week as the first foreign-sponsored university in North Korea, AFP reported. The university is backed by a foundation in South Korea, which has spent more than $32 million on the project. Faculty members will be Koreans -- from North and South Korea, and ethnic Koreans who live elsewhere.
September 11, 2009
The U.S. government's top copyright official criticized the settlement between Google and copyright holders over the company's controversial Google Books project, saying the arrangement is "not a settlement at all" but an "end run around legislative process and prerogatives" that could "dramatically compromise the legal rights" of authors and publishers.
September 11, 2009
A plan to increase charges at the University of California would result in students paying more than $10,000 annually by next fall in fees (which in every other state would be called tuition), an increase of 44 percent since the fall of 2008, the Los Angeles Times reported. The increases -- now under consideration by the Board of Regents -- are a response to deep cuts in state support.
September 11, 2009
The American Council on Education announced a new round of grants to encourage colleges to offer flexibility to professors seeking to advance their careers while also handling family responsibilities. Among the winners: Bowdoin College, which will use the funds to continue its work to accommodate partners using half-time tenure-track positions, job sharing for academic couples, and a "research associate" title for partners seeking an institutional affiliation.
September 11, 2009
State and other policymakers should be wary of making decisions based upon college rankings, says a report issued Thursday by the Institute for Higher Education Policy. The report reviews the research about rankings, and notes that while many educators may look down on rankings, they have the potential to have significant impact on public policy.
September 11, 2009
Studies at international peer review conference examine a practice that has drawn Congressional scrutiny: the publication of scholarly papers whose authors didn't write them.
September 10, 2009
The summer lull in federal higher ed policy making ended abruptly, with changes in Senate leadership, new regulation from the Education Department, and reports from the White House panel on the middle class.
September 10, 2009
The economic collapse of the last year has left many wondering why more economists didn't warn of the looming disaster. An article in The Huffington Post suggests that the problem is the increasingly close relationship between academic economists and the Federal Reserve, which is alleged to have made the professors reluctant to question what the Fed was saying.
September 10, 2009
Seventy-three percent of the 204 colleges participating in a study by the American College Health Association of the spread of H1N1 are reporting new cases in the last week. Rates of H1N1 on campus were the highest in the Southeast and Midwest. Details on the tracking research may be found here.
September 10, 2009
Howard University announced Wednesday several responses to student protests last week, but student leaders said that the university wasn't going far enough to deal with their concerns about inadequate services, The Washington Post reported. The university agreed to expand the hours that the financial aid office is open and to start a recycling program.

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