Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 5, 2009
Education Management Corporation's initial public offering was priced at the low end of its proposed range Friday, but gained during trading after launch, the Associated Press reported. Education Management is the third education IPO since November, following those of Grand Canyon Education, Inc. and Bridgepoint Education, Inc. Education Management's holdings include the Art Institutes and Argosy University.
October 5, 2009
The Phi Beta Kappa Society has voted to allow four more colleges to create chapters. The society admits new chapters only at its triennial meeting, and this year has accepted applications from Butler University, in Indiana; the College of Saint Benedict-Saint John’s University, in Minnesota; Elon University, in North Carolina; and James Madison University, in Virginia. The honorary society declined to name the colleges that were not successful in their bids to start chapters.
October 5, 2009
The National Archives and Records Administration has released a report on alternatives to the current system for housing presidential papers at libraries throughout the country The report was requested by Congress, amid concerns about the growing cost of the system in which foundations set up by recent presidents donate the records and affiliated museums to the National Archives. One possibility raised in the report (which does not draw a conclusion on the best option) would be to keep the museums under the control of the foundations, not the government.
October 5, 2009
The National Science Foundation announced a new round of grants for a controversial program in which social scientists conduct research relevant to the needs of the Department of Defense.
October 5, 2009
King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia has removed from a key position a cleric who recently criticized a new university for enrolling both male and female students, AFP reported. The cleric had called the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology's policy "evil." No reason was given the for the king's removal of the cleric, Sheikh Sa'ad al-Shethry, from the council that sets religious policy for the country.
October 5, 2009
In conference call with community college presidents, Obama administration officials offer support and praise -- and subtly seek backing for plan on restructuring financial aid programs.
October 2, 2009
University expenditures on research and development rose to $51.9 billion in 2008 fiscal year, but U.S. share of funds dipped, NSF data show.
October 2, 2009
Federal court's ruling denying Stanford rights to researcher's invention points to tension over policies on institutional vs. faculty ownership.
October 2, 2009
A state appeals court in Florida on Thursday ordered the National Collegiate Athletic Association to make public documents it produced during its investigation into academic wrongdoing in Florida State University's sports program, despite the association's best efforts to shield the papers.
October 2, 2009
Federal housing officials have sued Millikin University, charging that the institution discriminated against a blind student with epilepsy by refusing to allow her to have a trained service dog live in her dormitory room, the Chicago Tribune reported. The university denies wrongdoing and says that the dog's presence in the dorm would have caused problems for other students with respiratory issues.

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