Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 10, 2009
The Senate last week confirmed President Obama's nominees -- both popular with academics -- for two agencies that are key for supporting research: Francis Collins, a geneticist who led the Human Genome Project, will now lead the National Institutes of Health and James A. Leach, a former member of Congress, will now serve as chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
August 10, 2009
Idaho State University has suspended, banned from campus, and moved to terminate Habib Sadid, an engineering professor who has been at the university for 22 years, the Associated Press reported. While the university has not said why it is taking this action, Sadid organized a 2005 no-confidence vote in the then-president, who quit a year later. The vote was in protest of large pay increases for some administrators.
August 10, 2009
Rutgers University had to house hundreds of students temporarily in local hotels last year because of campus overcrowding. This year, about 500 students will call a nearby Crowne Plaza home for the entire academic year, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported, as enrollments and retention increase. Rutgers is one of many public universities seeing booms in enrollments, driven both by the economy and heightened price sensitivity by students and families.
August 10, 2009
Texas Tech University is starting a major campaign to attract applications from children of alumni donors -- and the effort will start at birth. The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal reported that for alumni or others who contribute at least $100 annually, the university will send offspring a blanket for their cribs, birthday cards and other gifts, and create special scholarships at the point that students are ready to apply.
August 10, 2009
The e-textbook company CourseSmart is making its books available on the iPhone through a deal with Apple, the Wall Street Journal reported. While company officials don't expect students to do heavy reading on their handheld devices, the application will make the full electronic texts and digital notes accessible when students are looking for answers in study groups, for example, they say.
August 10, 2009
With T.K. Wetherell having announced his plans to retire as president of Florida State University, a search is getting started to replace him. Justin de la Cruz, a graduate student, has started a campaign to select a Tallahassee native -- the rapper T-Pain -- for the job. A Web site is selling T-shirts that proclaim "Give Pain a Chance." The Facebook group for the "T-Pain Killa Cam-Pain" offers the following platform for the candidate:
August 7, 2009
The U.S. Education Department on Thursday proposed new regulations to carry out changes that Congress made last year to federal law governing higher education accreditation.
August 7, 2009
The board of Wheeling Jesuit University has fired the West Virginia college's president, the Rev. Julio Giulietti, just two years after he was named to the post, The Wheeling News-Register reported. While details were not available, Father Guilietti told the newspaper he would sue. He said: "I was surprised that the board president pushed for a vote on this before my evaluation was half completed.
August 7, 2009
Los Angeles City College, facing deep budget cuts, is suspending six of its seven athletics teams, the Los Angeles Times reported. Women's volleyball will continue because the season is about to start.
August 7, 2009
Providence College is going to the Rhode Island Supreme Court to appeal an order that the college turn over documents related to the 2002 death of 19-year-old student who slipped off of a dormitory rooftop, The Providence Journal reported. A judge had ordered release of the documents as part of a wrongful death suit by the student's father.

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