Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

June 11, 2009
For more than a year, Lambuth University has been experiencing severe financial problems, leading to turnover of key officials, a series of budget cuts, and late payrolls. The university is now in talks with Tennessee officials about becoming a public institution, The Jackson Sun reported.
June 11, 2009
The University of Idaho is investigating apparent discrepancies in the way the director of its veterinary teaching center denied the existence of research that was found by the Associated Press to exist.
June 11, 2009
In a move that is projected to save the institution nearly $60,000 annually, the University of Wisconsin at La Crosse is planning to eliminate its men’s tennis and baseball teams. The proposed cuts are part of a $400,000 trimming of the university’s operating budget.
June 11, 2009
University and med school groups endorse prospect of increased oversight of financial conflicts in biomedical research, up to a point.
June 10, 2009
For the second time in four years, Education Department cancels open grant competition for higher ed reform, as Congressional and White House priorities eat up the budget.
June 10, 2009
Education organizations received $40.9 billion in donations in 2008, down about 5.5 percent from the previous year, according to "Giving USA," an annual report on charitable giving. Donations to all charitable organizations were down from individuals (always the largest source of gifts), bequests, corporations and foundations. For most colleges, these national figures will come as no surprise.
June 10, 2009
Faculty leaders at Florida Atlantic University are protesting a planned reorganization of the engineering college that will result in the layoffs of five tenured professors, The Palm Beach Post reported. The university says that there are educational and financial reasons to make the changes. But professors say that the reorganization is an excuse to get rid of tenured professors who would otherwise be protected from layoffs.
June 10, 2009
Rep. Howard P. (Buck) McKeon, the senior Republican on the House of Representatives education committee, is leaving the panel to take the same position on the House Armed Services Committee, creating a vacuum in his party at a time when the committee will be considering significant student loan and other legislation. Congress Daily reported. McKeon, whose central California district has numerous military installations, became chairman of what is now called the House Education and Labor Committee in 2006 and has served as its top Republican ever since.
June 10, 2009
Federal investigators have ended a probe of the closure of Decker College without bringing charges, the Associated Press reported. Decker was a for-profit college based in Louisville, with other campuses elsewhere, that shut suddenly in 2005, leaving many students angry over commitments they thought they had received from the college.
June 10, 2009
Legislation that would provide the National Science Foundation with $6.9 billion and the National Institute of Standards and Technology with $510 million in 2010 advanced in the House of Representatives Tuesday. The full Appropriations Committee approved legislation that would increase funding significantly for several federal agencies that sponsor much of the country's scientific research, particularly in the physical sciences.

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