Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

May 7, 2010
Don't depend on one résumé to tell your whole story, especially if you're applying for multiple sorts of jobs, Jessica Quillin writes. Preparing two is extra work, but it's worth it.
May 6, 2010
Drake College of Business, a for-profit college, has announced that it will stop recruiting students in homeless shelters, Bloomberg reported. The news service exposed the practice, noting that many of those recruited borrow money to enroll, but don't advance very far in their programs, leaving the college with additional revenue and the homeless with debt.
May 6, 2010
Colorado State University on Wednesday rescinded its gun ban, citing a recent ruling by a Colorado court that invalidated a similar ban at the University of Colorado, the Associated Press reported. While advocates of the ban said it would promote safety, critics said that the university was exceeding its authority in an area in which the state has strict limits on the ability of agencies to regulate the carrying of guns.
May 6, 2010
The University of California at Berkeley, citing "genuine confusion" over when authorities ordered some protests to disperse in the fall, has dropped charges against dozens of students involved, and said it is reviewing some of its judicial rules, The New York Times reported. Students in the protests, with significant faculty backing, have criticized the university for restricting their right to protest.
May 6, 2010
Average tenured faculty salaries at the University of Toronto ($157,566) are the highest in Canada, according to new data from Statistics Canada, Canwest News Service reported. Fourteen universities now have average salaries for tenured faculty members that exceed $100,000.
May 5, 2010
About 20 students at the University of California at Berkeley started a hunger strike Monday, vowing not to eat until university officials take a strong stand against the new immigration law in Arizona that is viewed by many as encouraging ethnic profiling, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. The students are also demanding that disciplinary charges be dropped against those involved in an earlier protest, and that some janitors who lost their jobs be rehired.
May 5, 2010
The president of the University of Maine, Robert Kennedy, announced Tuesday that the university is accepting the controversial recommendations of a panel that identified ways for the Orono institution to save money and refocus on key areas. Among the changes: the elimination of the public administration department, the suspension of majors in German, Latin, theater and women's studies. and a range of other consolidations.
May 5, 2010
The Chicago Tribune, which broke the story last year about the "clout" list that enabled the politically connected to have preferences in University of Illinois admissions, is now reporting on who was helped by Michael Madigan, the speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives.
May 5, 2010
A federal judge has ordered a former professor who sued the University of Nevada at Reno, Hussein S. Hussein, and his former lawyer to pay the state $1.2 million for costs associated with lawsuits filed after Hussein lost his job, The Reno Gazette-Journal reported. The judge's ruling said: “Dr.
May 5, 2010
Shari VanDelinder, the development director of Rocky Mountain College, has sued the institution and President Michael Mace, charging him with being a "violent, threatening boss who drove away employees and potential donors," The Billings Gazette reported.

Pages

Back to Top