Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 30, 2010
Students, faculty members and some legislators are questioning the decision of the foundation of California State University at Stanislaus to invite Sarah Palin, the former vice presidential candidate, to be the lead speaker at a fund raiser in June, The Modesto Bee reported. Many are questioning why a divisive, partisan figure would be invited to celebrate the 50th anniversary of a public university.
March 30, 2010
A plan at the University of Maine to eliminate numerous majors is drawing criticism from advocates for those disciplines and from students and faculty members concerned about the liberal arts taking too large a hit, The Bangor Daily News reported. Among the majors proposed for elimination -- although lower division courses would continue to be offered in some cases -- are women's studies, French, German, Spanish, Latin, theater and music.
March 30, 2010
The University of Florida has told two master's students at the Documentary Institute that they cannot use footage they shot in Haiti for their thesis project because the university barred student travel to Haiti, The Gainesville Sun reported. The students say they needed the footage for their film, and used private funds to pay for the travel, but the university says that permitting the footage would undercut the travel ban.
March 30, 2010
The University of Louisville has agreed to pay $1 million to a former administrator who was asked to leave his job, The Louisville Courier-Journal reported. The revelation follows another report in the newspaper about a lobbyist paid not to work.
March 30, 2010
Newcastle University, in Britain, is using a series of personality characteristics to hire administrators, and some faculty members think the system is Orwellian, Times Higher Education reported. The qualities values those who "accept change and run with it," and suggests avoiding those who "express doubts" -- qualities faculty members say will produce those who won't question potentially negative changes.
March 30, 2010
Community colleges are used to "doing more with less" -- but if they weren't accustomed to it before the economic downturn, they are growing more so with each passing day, as a survey to be released today shows.
March 29, 2010
President Obama on Saturday announced that he was making recess appointments of 15 of his nominees whose confirmations have been blocked by Senate Republicans' refusal to allow votes on them -- and two appointees in particular could lead to a major change for higher education. Those appointees -- Craig Becker and Mark Pearce -- will restore a quorum to the National Labor Relations Board.
March 29, 2010
The Educational Credit Management Corporation, a guarantor of federal student loans, announced Friday that a "portable media" device recently stolen had personally identifiable information -- including names, addresses, dates of birth and Social Security numbers -- on 3.3 million borrowers, co-signers and others. The theft occurred during the weekend of March 20-21 and was discovered by ECMC on the afternoon of Sunday, March 21.
March 29, 2010
What's it like being John Yoo, the one-time Bush administration official whose memos are widely seen as endorsing torture and who is now back teaching law (to the dismay of activists who want him ousted) at the University of California at Berkeley? He told the Los Angeles Times he relishes his role and isn't intimidated by the many at the university who want him gone, or who defend his right to be there while finding his ideas offensive.
March 29, 2010
The University of Nebraska at Omaha is home to the Center for Afghanistan Studies, an academic center created in the 1970s, before Afghanistan was a hot spot in global conflict. As a result, the center's officials became much-quoted and the center has attracted numerous grants for its work as the country has become key to U.S. foreign policy.

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