Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

May 7, 2009
A federal judge has applied a new federal law on when people can file claims of discriminatory pay by employers to a tenure suit against Jackson State University, The Jackson Clarion-Ledger reported. The new law is named for Lilly Ledbetter, who lost a suit on pay bias not on the merits, but based on when she brought the action. The new law extends the time in which plaintiffs may sue.
May 7, 2009
A federal grand jury has indicted two Detroit businessmen and six former University of Toledo athletes on charges of point-shaving and related offenses, The Toledo Blade reported. The incidents involved both football and basketball games, and the point-shaving is alleged to have been motivated by gambling. Lloyd Jacobs, president of the university, noted in a letter to students and faculty members that many reforms have been instituted to the athletics program.
May 7, 2009
The Modern Language Association is sending a letter to all English and foreign language department chairs urging them to organize discussions and activism to draw attention to the treatment of adjuncts. The letter follows on both reports and policy positions issued by the MLA, and urges discussions with department members and administrators, publicizing "best practices" on the use of non-tenure-track faculty members (including minimum per course payments), urging the conversion of part-time positions to full-time and so forth.
May 7, 2009
A local district attorney raided offices at the City College of San Francisco Wednesday seeking evidence that college officials illegally spent public funds on donations to campaigns on behalf of bond measures that helped the college, The San Francisco Chronicle reported.
May 7, 2009
A Wesleyan University student was shot and killed Wednesday while working at a cafe. The university issued a series of security alerts and asked students to abandon plans to hold a vigil in the student's memory. "There is no reason to believe that the perpetrator of the shooting earlier today is on or near the campus, but we believe that the Wesleyan community could possibly be at risk.
May 7, 2009
Our Lady of the Lake University on Wednesday commemorated the one-year anniversary of a four-alarm fire that devastated its historic Main Building. The rebuilding process is progressing, with fall 2010 the targeted date for completion.
May 7, 2009
As Amazon unveils new version of its Kindle reader and underscores implications for electronic textbooks, perceptions vary on whether step is transformative.
May 6, 2009
U. of Alaska strips federal grant money from extension agent over his environmental "advocacy," drawing complaint that it bowed to agency's pressure.
May 6, 2009
A state judge has dismissed a lawsuit challenging the University of Colorado Board of Regents' ban on carrying concealed weapons on the system's campuses, The Colorado Springs Gazette reported. The suit was brought by three students who said that relevant state law protected their right to carry concealed weapons. But the judge ruled that their legal argument was based on a false assumption that the university system should be considered a locality.
May 6, 2009
In at least one way, this unusual admissions year is proving to be normal: For all the talk about how application surges would make it difficult to find spots, there are still plenty of colleges (at least 258 of them) that still have openings for the fall, and most of them still have financial aid, housing, and spaces for both freshmen and transfer students.

Pages

Back to Top