Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 29, 2010
Education Trust, which just two weeks ago released a report slamming flagship universities for not doing enough to enroll and graduate low-income and minority students, is drawing attention to some success stories.
January 29, 2010
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist is talking up his plan to provide an extra $100 million in funds to Florida's universities next year, but not everyone is convinced he has the money. The plan would focus the new money on degrees and programs that result in jobs for graduates or economic development for the state. While legislative leaders say that they like the theory, The Miami Herald reported that they are skeptical of the availability of funds.
January 29, 2010
A report released today by the Data Quality Campaign assesses progress in state efforts to use longitudinal student-level data to gauge and improve students' progress through the educational system. The report concludes that states have made significant progress in building data systems (with a big financial and policy push from the Obama administration) but far less headway in using the data to change educational practices.
January 29, 2010
The Maricopa Community College District's board has authorized Chancellor Rufus Glasper to carry out a series of efficiency moves, The Arizona Republic reported. Among the possible shifts: increases in class sizes, greater reliance on adjunct faculty members, outsourcing of landscaping and a new information technology fee. The consultants who developed the options said that they could save the district up to $48 million a year.
January 29, 2010
The Institute for International Education has created an emergency grants fund to help students from Haiti on campuses in the United States. Colleges may nominate up to five students for awards of up to $2,000 to those who are facing financial hardships because of the devastation caused by the earthquake. Details and nomination forms may be found here.
January 29, 2010
Rutgers University police have arrested six members of Sigma Gamma Rho sorority, charging them with beating at least three pledges for seven consecutive nights, The Star-Ledger reported. The university and the sorority's national organization immediately suspended the Rutgers chapter.
January 29, 2010
A former nursing professor at Tennessee State University falsified data and results in federally sponsored research on sexual risk behaviors among mentally ill homeless men, the Office of Research Integrity at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced Thursday.
January 29, 2010
An Illinois state representative, Monique Davis, announced Thursday that she will return to Chicago State University a $25,000 statue from the university that ended up in the lawmaker's office the Chicago Sun-Times reported. It remains unclear how the statue ended up in her office. Chicago State officials asked for it back, without success, but pressure grew on Davis to return it after a Sun-Times columnist revealed the situation last week.
January 29, 2010
Bipartisan legislation would define dubious institutions (and the agencies that accredit them), bar use of phony degrees in federal hiring and promotion, and strengthen Federal Trade Commission enforcement.
January 28, 2010
OECD will develop international version of Collegiate Learning Assessment to gauge whether comparisons are valid across countries -- including the U.S.

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