Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 6, 2009
Legislators are complaining about a University of Wyoming policy adopted in May to authorize administrators to issue vouchers for the health insurance for the domestic partners of employees, The Casper Star-Tribune reported. The policy approved by the university's board allows the vouchers to be issued only if any additional costs can be managed.
July 6, 2009
Mark A. Sargent resigned unexpectedly as law dean at Villanova University last week. On Friday, police reports emerged identifying Sargent as a customer of a prostitution ring who cooperated with police, leading to the arrest of the man who ran the operation, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. University officials declined to comment except to say that Sargent would not be returning to the law school's faculty. Sargent could not be reached for comment.
July 6, 2009
Britain's Liverpool Hope University has infuriated faculty members by saying that it expects their work days to be spent on campus and not -- as many faculty members doing writing or grading do -- working from home.
July 2, 2009
Chowan University, in North Carolina, has become the first college that is not historically black to join the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association, the nation's oldest athletic league for historically black colleges. The move follows a year in which Chowan joined the conference for football only. Chowan is located near many of the conference's members, and shares values about the role of athletics in higher education, officials said.
July 2, 2009
The University of the Cumberlands, a Baptist university in Kentucky, has told a youth group from the Broadway Baptist Church, in Fort Worth, Texas, that it has revoked an invitation for the students to stay at the university while working to help the disadvantaged in Appalachia.
July 2, 2009
Last December, NBC News producers approached officials at Goucher College, in Baltimore, asking serious questions about Leopold Munyakazi, a visiting French professor from Rwanda.
July 2, 2009
Two high-ranking nominees in the Obama administration have been confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Martha J. Kanter, under secretary of education, and Jane Oates, assistant secretary of labor for employment and training, gained the Senate's stamp of approval on June 19, giving them formal authority to dive into their duties. Oates, a longtime aide to Sen. Edward M.
July 2, 2009
The leaders of some British universities found themselves sharing a little more information than expected when a journal published their views -- prior to the chance they had been promised to clear quotes and use of their names, The Times Higher reported. The journal Higher Education Quarterly has since removed the article from its Web site, but not before the Times Higher saved a copy.
July 1, 2009
Colleges in most states have, since a national change made in 2006, been granted the authority to spend endowment money from individual funds whose value has fallen below what it was when originally made. A new survey suggests that institutions have taken advantage of that additional flexibility.
July 1, 2009
Colleges are making it more expensive for families to pay tuition bills with credit cards. USA Today reported that a growing number of colleges are adding fees to such payments, to offset the fees colleges must pay the credit card companies. Among the colleges that have adopted or are starting fees, the newspaper said: George Mason, Northwestern, and Wichita State Universities, and the Universities of Southern Maine and Virginia.

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