Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

June 3, 2009
John R. Broderick, interim president of Old Dominion University, in Virginia, has been named to the job on a permanent basis.Fred Kniss, chair of the department of sociology at Loyola University Chicago, has been selected as provost at Eastern Mennonite University.The Rev.
June 2, 2009
To "put students first," Milwaukee technical college unions voluntarily forgo annual pay raise rather than take furloughs; in exchange, administration commits to no layoffs for two years.
June 2, 2009
Significantly more colleges have policies to help employees maneuver work/life balance than they did in 2002, but many approaches are informal, study finds.
June 2, 2009
The Division III Centennial Conference announced an agreement Monday to reduce expenses on athletics programs. Under the plan, new limits will be set on the size of travel squads for 14 sports, the start of competition will be moved back, and some championship tournaments will be shortened. In addition, the conference plans to work with others in Division III to cut expenses that officials believe may not be needed, such as microphones for football officials.
June 2, 2009
The Education Department on Monday announced the appointment of William J. Taggart as chief operating officer of the agency's federal student aid office. The aid office was the federal government's first "performance based organization," which gives it more flexibility than most units in the department, as well as accountability measures. Taggart has 24 years of business management experience, most recently as president and chief executive officer of Veritas One Consulting, based in North Carolina.
June 1, 2009
Ronald Takaki, a long-time professor of ethnic studies at the University of California at Berkeley and a pioneer in the field, died last week at the age of 70. For years, Takaki fought multiple sclerosis. Takaki was best known for his work in Asian American history and was the author of numerous books, including Strangers From a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans. But Takaki's work extended beyond Asian Americans.
June 1, 2009
A six-month investigation by The Columbus Dispatch has found that colleges and universities use "wildly different legal interpretations" of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act to deny access to information about athletics programs.
June 1, 2009
E. Gordon Gee, president of Ohio State University, has resigned as a board member of Massey Energy, a company that critics say engages in environmentally destructive practices to assist in coal mining. The announcement from Massey noted Gee's "responsibilities" leading Ohio State and thanked him for his service on the board on which he has served nearly nine years.
June 1, 2009
Non-tenure track faculty members at Michigan State University have voted to unionize, 240-113. The new bargaining unit, affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers, will cover both full-time and part-time professors who are off the tenure track.
June 1, 2009
Smith, Mount Holyoke and Hampshire Colleges plan to merge their public safety departments, The Republican reported. The move is expected to save money while also giving all three colleges the ability to have more security officers on site for major events, minimizing the need to pay overtime for such security coverage.

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