Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 16, 2010
About 12,000 students in Texas -- or 1 percent of all college students in the state -- lack the legal documentation to show that they reside in the United States legally, The Dallas Morning News reported. The figures come amid a legal challenge to a state law that grants such students in-state tuition rates if they meet certain conditions.
March 16, 2010
The trustee for the bankrupt consulting firm BearingPoint is suing Yale University for the $6 million the firm donated to the university in the two years before it sought bankruptcy protection, The Wall Street Journal reported. The money was used to endow a chair in management and for various facilities. Federal law allows for the recovery of some funds paid out by bankrupt firms prior to their bankruptcy.
March 16, 2010
Linda Thompson Adams, dean and professor of nursing at Oakland University, in Michigan, has been selected as provost and vice chancellor of academic affairs at North Carolina A&T State University.Diana Doyle, executive vice president of learning and student affairs at Community College of Denver, in Colorado, has been appointed president of Arapahoe Community College, a
March 15, 2010
With Congress set to take up health measure, Democrats strip community college funds, accountability provisions and more from loan overhaul.
March 15, 2010
Butler University's faculty has rejected a student proposal to invite John Roberts, chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, to be the commencement speaker this year, The Indianapolis Star reported. Roberts has a niece in the graduating class. Faculty members said that they voted down the idea not because they object to Roberts's ideas, but because they generally avoid political figures for commencement speakers.
March 15, 2010
Arizona's public universities were ordered by the Board of Regents Friday to cut their payroll costs by 2.75 percent, The Arizona Daily Star reported. It is unclear whether institutions will cut salaries or order layoffs. In the last two years, about 2,000 jobs were eliminated and thousands of other higher education employees in the state had furloughs.
March 15, 2010
Colin Carlson, a child prodigy who at 13 is a double major (with a 3.9 grade point average) in ecology and evolutionary biology and environmental studies at the University of Connecticut, has filed an age bias complaint with the U.S.
March 15, 2010
Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon last week proposed ending the eligibility of private college students for various state aid programs, The Columbia Daily Tribune reported. A spokesman said that the savings could amount to $50 million a year. "It’s not that we’re against private colleges in Missouri. There are great private colleges in Missouri.
March 15, 2010
The University of California at Los Angeles failed to report a serious lab accident 13 months before a similar one in 2007 that led to a death, the Los Angeles Times reported. Last week, a state agency fined UCLA $23,900 for the earlier incident.
March 15, 2010
A state judge has ordered the University of California to pay $38 million in refunds and interest to former professional school students whose tuition rates were raised despite pledges that they would remain level, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. The ruling applies to those who accepted offers to enroll to study business, dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy or veterinary medicine prior to August 2003.

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