Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 27, 2009
When Texas Tech University first announced that Alberto Gonzales, attorney general under President George W. Bush, has been hired to teach political science, faculty reaction was quiet, while some students and alumni objected, citing the role Gonzales played in authorizing what many see as torture and unconstitutional actions by U.S. authorities. Now the faculty is getting involved, or at least some of it is.
July 27, 2009
Colorado State University's board has settled lawsuits by media entities challenging a closed door meeting at which a new chancellor was selected by releasing a recording of much of the meeting. As The Fort Collins Coloradoan noted, not all of the recordings are of statements board members wanted to be heard.
July 27, 2009
The University of New Hampshire’s men’s ice hockey team has been placed on a two-year probation by the National Collegiate Athletic Association for major recruiting violations.
July 27, 2009
Last week we reported on the creation of a new position -- "dean of engaged learning" -- at Robert Morris University, and noted that many experts had never heard of such a position previously. At least one other university has made a similar move, however. Fairfield University this month announced that Elizabeth Boquet, professor of English and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Fairfield, has been tapped to serve as the first dean of academic engagement.
July 24, 2009
The chancellor of City College of San Francisco, Don Griffin, has revived his plan to have donors "sponsor" courses that would otherwise be eliminated due to budget cuts, and this time he may win over a previously skeptical board.
July 24, 2009
Do-it-yourself tuition collection by professors apparently doesn't go over well at Florida Gulf Coast University. The Fort Myers News-Press reported that the university has fired a professor, Donald Lounsbury, after an audit found that he had collected cash and checks from students for payments for his interview and interrogation criminal justice courses and deposited them directly in his own account, not a university account.
July 24, 2009
Robert Doade, an associate professor of philosophy at Trinity Western University, in British Columbia, is among those academics who believe Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other forms of social media may be distracting students and causing them anxiety. So Doade challenges students by offering them a 5 percent extra credit bonus if they will abstain from all social and traditional media for the three month semester of his philosophy course, and keep a journal about the experience.
July 24, 2009
President of financial aid group quits amid charges related to past position, as student aid officials put forward alternative to Obama student loan plan.
July 23, 2009
The U.S. Education Department proposed regulations today to carry out new federal laws governing student loans that were enacted when Congress renewed the Higher Education Act last summer.
July 23, 2009
President Obama held a press conference Wednesday evening to promote his health care proposals, but he received a question about the recent arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr., the Harvard professor who was handcuffed at his own home after police investigated a report of someone (Gates himself) trying to break into his own home when the door was jammed. Obama joined many others who have criticized the arrest and related it to the trend of racial profiling. He said: "I think it’s fair to say, No.

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