Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

February 15, 2010
Shirley Ann Jackson, president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, was the eighth most well compensated corporate director in 2008, according to an analysis by Bloomberg. She earned a total of $1,346,648 for her board work, while also earning $1.6 million from RPI.
February 15, 2010
Lindenwood University, in Missouri, has agreed to recognize a gay-straight student alliance, but only on the condition that the group expand its reach to include "other students in need of understanding and support," The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. Student organizers said that they viewed the compromise as a step forward that would allow them to form the group.
February 15, 2010
A committee in the Utah House of Representatives on Friday approved a measure that would give voters in the state the chance to ban affirmative action by all state agencies, including public colleges and universities, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. The vote was party-line with Republicans -- who control both houses of the Legislature -- backing the idea of amending the state's Constitution.
February 15, 2010
A New York Times investigation into the Congressional Black Caucus raises questions about its fund raising strategies and whether they help students, as claimed. Strict limits apply to corporate donations to the caucus, but the Times reported that the organization raises many millions in corporate dollars through its nonprofit affiliates that publicly exist to support scholarships and internships for students.
February 15, 2010
Erskine Bowles, president of the University of North Carolina System, announced Friday that he will retire at the end of the year, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. Bowles took office in 2006 and has pushed for better long-term planning and closer ties to elementary and secondary education. He has also helped the system deal with several controversies at various campuses, including a recent one over payments to administrators transitioning back to the faculty.
February 12, 2010
President Obama will give commencement addresses at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and Hampton University this spring, the universities announced Thursday.
February 12, 2010
The Missouri Coordinating Board for Higher Education is declining to get involved in a dispute between public and private colleges over the state's student aid program, The Kansas City Star reported. The current system allows students at private colleges, which generally have higher tuition rates, to receive a maximum of $4,600, more than twice the maximum grant to students at public institutions. As a result, more aid goes to private than public institutions.
February 12, 2010
The National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I Committee on Infractions on Thursday punished the University of Central Florida for a series of recruiting violations in its football program. The case was resolved through the association's summary disposition process.
February 12, 2010
Lord Mandelson, who as Britain's business secretary has pushed deep budget cuts and other policy changes opposed by many academic leaders, fought back Thursday with a speech in which he said higher education was not receiving more than its share of cuts and that academics needed to be more open to change, The Guardian reported. Academics "think they have a right to be set in aspic in what they do," he said.

Pages

Back to Top