Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

February 8, 2010
The Christian Legal Society is attracting wide support -- particularly from religious organizations -- in its U.S. Supreme Court battle over whether public colleges and universities can enforce their anti-bias rules against religious groups. In December, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case involving the society's chapter at the Hastings College of Law of the University of California.
February 8, 2010
Organizers of the Secular Students of Concordia are trying to get officials of the Minnesota college to reconsider their refusal to recognize the organization, The Fargo-Moorhead Forum reported. College officials said that they could not recognize a group committed to ideals that conflict with those of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, with which the college is affiliated.
February 8, 2010
In the last decade, the number of cheating cases considered by Stanford University's judicial board has more than doubled, to 123 from 52, The San Jose Mercury News reported. Stanford officials attributed the increase both to more cheating and more reporting by faculty members. University analysis found that although computer science students make up 6.5 percent of Stanford's students, they accounted for 23 percent of violations of the university's honors code.
February 8, 2010
A special commission to study the future of the University of California is hearing a wide range of ideas, but not all observers believe the commission is the best approach to finding the right ideas, the Los Angeles Times reported. The commission has been hearing ideas such as offering three-year undergraduate degrees, increasing the use of online education, and replacing tuition with post-graduation fees based on income.
February 8, 2010
Gay students and supporters at John Carroll University staged a sit-in on the basketball court prior to the start of a game last week to protest the university's refusal to add sexual orientation to the official anti-bias policy at the institution. The protest, filmed and then placed on YouTube, ended when students were escorted -- without arrests -- from the court.
February 8, 2010
Need more evidence of the disconnect between big-time college sports and the institutions to which they are appended? The University of Southern California's football team has committed one of its football scholarships for the 2015 entering class to David Sills, a 13-year-old quarterback at a middle school in Delaware, The News-Journal of Wilmington reported.
February 8, 2010
The former executive director of a foundation that encourages college enrollment says she was fired because she questioned an arrangement in which the organization pays $40,000 annually to the commissioner of higher education in Texas, Raymund Paredes, The Dallas Morning News reported. Others also question the arrangement, given that the commissioner already has a $180,000 salary for his job.
February 8, 2010
The University of Louisville's foundation awarded a $200,000, no-bid contract to an advertising company led by a university trustee, The Lexington Herald-Leader reported. James Ramsey, president of the university and its foundation, said it was "a mistake" to award the contract in this way to an advertising business.
February 8, 2010
The case of a first-year student at the University of Oxford, apparently admitted courtesy of a high school and testing record he didn't earn, has led to increased scrutiny of the admissions system there, Times Higher Education reported. The student in question reported 10 A-grade A-level exams, a notable accomplishment in the British system -- except that it was false. A teacher's recommendation was also forged.
February 8, 2010
New research from the University of Bristol finds that, in Britain at least, people who own a cat are more likely than those who own dogs to have a university degree, the BBC reported. According to the study, 47.2 percent of households with a cat have at least one person with a university degree, while the figure is only 38.4 percent for those with a dog. One theory suggested for this pet gap is that the university graduates have jobs with longer working hours that may make it more difficult to care for a dog.

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