Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 22, 2009
Darrel D. Colson, provost and dean at Centenary College, in Louisiana, has been chosen as president of Wartburg College, in Iowa.Sharon L.
May 22, 2009
How could things get worse in California, where voter rejection of a series of budget measures Tuesday has left public higher education planning for deep budget cuts? Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Republican, could go after the state's student aid program -- and the Los Angeles Times reported that is a serious possibility. According to the newspaper, the governor is considering a plan to eliminate new CalGrants.
May 22, 2009
For months, Texas legislators have been lobbied about the state's "10 percent" admissions law, which admits all high school graduates in the state who are in the top 10 percent of their classes to the public institution of their choice. The University of Texas at Austin wants to limit the law, because too large a share of its freshman class is admitted that way. Advocates for minority students want to preserve the law, saying it has brought diversity to higher education.
May 22, 2009
The Global Campus of the University of Illinois, an online program that has been controversial with faculty members, has had sufficiently disappointing enrollment numbers that the university's board this week approved major revisions in the program.
May 22, 2009
It's not just U.S. News. Rankings of various types are having an impact on higher education all over the world. A new report from the Institute for Higher Education Policy examines the impact of these rankings, with a focus on four countries: Australia, Canada, Germany and Japan
May 21, 2009
The mayor of Providence, David N. Cicilline, has been floating ideas for weeks on how to get tax revenue out of private colleges -- alarming many of them in the process. On Wednesday, he formally unveiled his proposals, which will be considered by Rhode Island lawmakers, The Providence Journal reported. One bill would allow local governments to tax private colleges $150 for every full-time student enrolled from out of the state.
May 21, 2009
For years, various groups have urged that academic medical centers should reduce the total hours and consecutive hours that medical residents work, and focus more on educational programming for them. A study released Wednesday by the RAND Corporation and the University of California at Los Angeles examines the cost of enacting such reforms, and says that they would cost teaching hospitals $1.6 billion annually.
May 21, 2009
Brandeis University has told all employees that it will suspend for one year any institutional contributions to retirement funds. The university has been facing a serious budget shortfall, leading to a controversial plan -- currently under review -- to sell a highly regarded art collection. Many institutions have been trying of late to add retirement incentives to encourage more senior employees to consider retiring. Brandeis employees can continue to make their own contributions to their retirement accounts. The university will save $7.4 million by suspending its contributions.
May 21, 2009
College officials who complain about the ever-growing volumes of federal regulations that apply to their institutions have a new way to vent.
May 21, 2009
Questioned on college prices by House members, education secretary suggests that students and parents will increasingly abandon high-tuition institutions for less-costly alternatives.

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