Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 3, 2010
5 foundations back new group to propel state efforts to get more people into and out of college with credentials.
March 3, 2010
Towson University fired an adjunct last week after he called himself, in class, a "nigger on a corporate plantation," The Baltimore Sun reported. Allen Zaruba, the adjunct, made the comment in a discussion of controversial works of art. Zaruba, who is white, told the Sun he realized that he shouldn't have made the remark and that he apologized for the comment, and didn't think it unsettled his class.
March 3, 2010
Northwest College, a community college in Wyoming, announced Tuesday that it will no longer recruit students based on their religion. The announcement follows controversy over the news that Paul B. Prestwich, the president, sent recruitment letters to about 1,000 Mormon high school students last month, encouraging them to apply.
March 3, 2010
The recession is leading more adults in their 40s and 50s to seek additional training and education at community colleges. And the recession is leading more students who are traditional college ages to enroll at community colleges. An article in the Chicago Tribune notes a result of these two trends: more courses at community colleges in which parents and children are both enrolled.
March 3, 2010
Even as thousands of students at the University of California's campuses prepare for massive rallies Thursday over state budget cuts, they continue to be roiled by racial incidents. The University of California at San Diego, which has seen a series of incidents, had a new one Monday night when authorities found a white pillowcase on a statue outside the library, making the pillowcase appear to be a Klan-style hood. Police are investigating the incident.
March 3, 2010
Universities from around the world have pledged a total of $350,000 to the OpenCourseWare Consortium, which promotes the concept of colleges and universities making course materials available online and free. The popular effort was originally supported by foundation grants and some have worried about whether funds would be found to replace the expiring grants.
March 3, 2010
Four members of Kansas' Congressional delegation have written the U.S. interior secretary expressing their concerns about how Haskell Indian Nations University is being run and whether federal money is being misspent. The letter to Secretary Ken Salazar from Sens. Pat Roberts and Sam Brownback and Reps.
March 3, 2010
The Atheist Agenda at the University of Texas at San Antonio has found a way to attract converts away from religion (or at least to publicize that cause). The San Antonio Express-News reported that the group has attracted considerable attention with a "smut for smut" offer in which students who turn in a Bible or another religious text can receive a free pornographic magazine. The atheists say that the "smut for smut" title is appropriate because the Bible includes passages about violence and torture.
March 2, 2010
An anonymous student -- identified only as a minority woman -- has admitted to accidentally leaving a noose in a library at the University of California at San Diego last week, an incident that inflamed already tense race relations and set off new protests at the institution, the Los Angeles Times reported. The student said that the noose was "a stupid mistake" and not intended as a racial comment.
March 2, 2010
Students gathered at the University of Missouri at Columbia Monday night to discuss the ramifications of an incident in which cotton balls were scattered in front of the university's Black Culture Center, The Columbia Missourian reported. The cotton balls were seen by many as a reference to slavery and as "symbolic violence," according to participants at the meeting. Students at the meeting criticized the university for not doing enough to advance diversity.

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