Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

June 23, 2009
LIberty University, which has been under criticism for denying recognition to a campus Democratic group, on Monday announced a new policy on political clubs that will treat Democrats and Republicans the same way.
June 23, 2009
Just days after DePaul University ousted a popular law dean in a dispute over how much of the law school's budget should be shared with the university, an associate dean has quit to protest the way the interim dean was selected without faculty involvement.
June 23, 2009
Texas Gov. Rick Perry on Friday vetoed House Bill 103, which would have made Texas the first state to require its high-enrollment colleges – those with 20,000 or more students – to bill students’ private insurance for care they receive at campus health centers.
June 23, 2009
LANSDOWNE, Va. -- The higher education pipeline in 16 southern states is filled with the very students who historically have had the most difficulty graduating from college, the Southern Regional Education Board reported at its meeting here Monday.
June 23, 2009
Two higher education experiments have received high-profile financial boosts. Jack Welch, the former CEO of General Electric, has invested more than $2 million for a 12 percent stake in Chancellor University, a for-profit college that was formerly Myers University, in Cleveland, the Wall Street Journal reported. In return, Chancellor will name its M.B.A. program for Welch.
June 23, 2009
Four members of Congress have sent a letter asking the National Academies to appoint a national commission to identify the "top 10 actions" that Congress, state governments and others could take to strengthen the international competitive position of American research universities, saying: "We are concerned that they are at risk." The signers were Sens. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), and Reps.
June 23, 2009
Discussion of how colleges might respond to economic crisis sees possibility of major change -- and great risk if higher ed dallies like health care and journalism.
June 22, 2009
For two years, ever since New York Attorney General Andrew M. Cuomo began hitting up lenders and colleges for six- and seven-figure payments to settle accusations that they had violated state laws with their student loan practices, his critics have wondered what he planned to do with the millions of dollars he's collected.
June 22, 2009
Like community colleges throughout California, City College of San Francisco is facing such deep budget cuts that it is planning to eliminate hundreds of courses and sections. So the college is offering donors the ability to save a course -- and have the course named for them -- for $6,000, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Currently, about 800 classes are slated to be canceled.
June 22, 2009
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and MDC Inc. are today announcing $16.5 million in grants to 15 community colleges in 6 states to expand remedial education efforts that appear to be having significantly more success than the norm. More than 133,000 students take remedial courses at the colleges involved and the rate at which students move from remedial to college-level work went from 16 to 20 percent for those involved. The strategies involve the use of technology to teach basic skills, mentorships and better coordination between high schools and community colleges.

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