Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

April 3, 2009
The University of Puget Sound announced that in May it will award honorary bachelor of arts degrees to 39 former students who were among the Japanese Americans sent to internment camps in 1942. University officials believe that only a handful of the former students are still alive, but Puget Sound is trying to reach family members of the deceased, so that the degrees can be presented to someone in person. “Each loyal student removed from campus at that time represented a life and an education suddenly interrupted,” said Ronald R. Thomas, president of the university, in a statement.
April 3, 2009
The Calder Foundation and the University of Virginia have announced a policy change in response to an unusual protest about a scuplture. When the university installed "Tripes," a masterpiece by Alexander Calder, on the campus, a sign was posting barring photographs of the work, which is on loan from the foundation.
April 3, 2009
A Vancouver accountant has won a victory for all of those who have clashed with the all-powerful campus parking police. Ruling in a class action, a provincial court has found that the University of British Columbia never had the power to issue parking tickets, The Vancouver Province reported. While the university has the right to remove cars that are illegally parked, the court ruled that the university could only charge for costs, not impose additional fines.
April 3, 2009
Two-year institutions gear up to tap into federal stimulus legislation's innovative mechanism for distributing Workforce Investment Act funds, which allows for contracts for entire courses.
April 2, 2009
Martha Kanter, chancellor of California's Foothill-De Anza district, is President Obama's nominee to be federal under secretary of education.
April 2, 2009
Kenneth Ender, president and chief executive officer of Cumberland County College, in New Jersey, has been selected as president of Harper College, in Illinois. Frank A.
April 2, 2009
The U.S. Education Department on Wednesday published detailed guidance about the tens of billions of dollars it is making available to states to restore funds cut from their elementary, secondary and higher education programs.
April 2, 2009
Paul Zingg, president of California State University at Chico, was assaulted in his office on Wednesday. The Chico Enterprise Record reported that authorities detained a man who arrived in the office asking to "speak with the person in charge" and who then struck Zingg in the face and started assaulting him in a conference area in his office. Zingg suffered only minor injuries and was back at work later in the day. Authorities arrested Abe Baxter Stutts Jr. for the assault and could not determine a motive.
April 2, 2009
Officials at Brigham Young University are apologizing for an accident last week in which all of the students in the College of Humanities (about 2,500) received an e-mail with the grade point averages of all of their fellow students, with names. University officials said that the e-mail with the students' grades was intended for the registrar, and never should have been sent out to everyone. Officials apologized and pledged to institute controls to prevent similar mistakes in the future.
April 2, 2009
Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado is now in the hands of the jury. The Denver Post reported on closing arguments in the case, in which Churchill maintains he was fired for his political views and the university says that he was fired for repeated instances of scholarly misconduct. Patrick O'Rourke, the universit's lawyer, closed by saying: "The University of Colorado must diligently prevent misconduct.

Pages

Back to Top