Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 20, 2010
Residents of college towns complain all the time about students whose parties keep them up or leave messes in the neighborhood. Some Berkeley residents have gone a step further, and they are suing more than 70 fraternities and property owners in the area near the University of California at Berkeley, saying that the actions of those living in the houses make it impossible for others to live in the area, The Contra Costa Times reported.
January 20, 2010
The University of Manitoba has suspended the gym memberships of 80 students after linking them to a Facebook group that was promoting a fight club meeting in a squash court on the campus, The Winnipeg Free Press reported. The Facebook group has since been deleted.
January 20, 2010
The following meetings, conferences, seminars and other events will be held in the coming weeks in and around higher education. They are among the many such that appear in our calendar on The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of job changes in higher education. This listing will appear as a regular feature in this space.
January 20, 2010
David P. Angel, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Clark University, in Massachusetts, has been named president there.Terry Brown, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, has been chosen as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at University of Wisconsin-Parkside.Roger N.
January 19, 2010
At time of financial peril in higher education, USA Today data show level of institutional financing for athletics programs is large and growing.
January 19, 2010
Education fund raisers are projecting a 3.7 percent increase in giving during 2010, according to a survey being released today by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. CASE is expecting final figures for 2009 to show a slight decline in giving. If the projection is correct, it would still be a smaller increase than was the norm before the economic downturn hit, but would still be welcomed by many colleges in comparison to 2009's performance.
January 19, 2010
Students, alumni and supporters of Mississippi's three public historically black universities marked Martin Luther King Day by marching in Jackson to protest Gov. Haley Barbour's plan to merge two of the institutions, Alcorn State and Mississippi Valley State Universities, into Jackson State University, WJTV reported.
January 18, 2010
Four freshmen at the Mississippi University for Women were killed in a fire that broke out in an Alabama motel Saturday night, The Jackson Clarion-Ledger reported. University officials are reaching out to those who knew the students and are offering counseling. Two of the victims were cousins.
January 18, 2010
Colorado legislators are proposing that limits be set on payments that have allowed Native American students to attend Fort Lewis College tuition-free, the Associated Press reported. The tuition waiver arises out of a 1911 treaty in which tribes agreed to give up land in return for a series of pledges, including one that the state create a college that Native American students could attend without paying.
January 18, 2010
The University of Hawaii and its faculty union have reached an agreement that will cut salaries now but eventually provide raises, The Honolulu Advertiser reported. The university and the union agreed to keep the terms confidential so there is no official word on the provisions, but the Advertiser reported that it includes a 6.7 percent pay cut, which would be restored over the term of the contract, followed by raises.

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