Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 8, 2010
A former police officer in Philadelphia is facing extortion charges over an unconventional approach to dealing with his son's unpaid dormitory bill. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that Vincent Gaudini Sr.
March 8, 2010
Democrats' plan to consider health care legislation through "budget reconciliation" process has implications for student loan reform -- not all of them good.
March 5, 2010
U.S. agency concedes that before 2005, when it issued new rules, doctors in training were students for whom payroll taxes were not required.
March 5, 2010
Wheaton College, in Illinois, will cut five sports at the end of the academic year. Athletics officials announced Tuesday that the college, a member of Division III of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, will get rid of men’s and women’s golf, men’s tennis, men’s indoor track and women’s water polo. Tony Ladd, athletics director said, “Our athletics budget has been under increasing strain the past 10 years.
March 5, 2010
For many, a March tradition is predicting the various outcomes that will lead some teams to advance in the men's basketball tournament of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. With the outcome of the Google Books settlement unclear, an alliance of three library organizations has released -- in a way that makes NCAA brackets seem simple -- a chart showing the various possibilities for the Google case.
March 5, 2010
The Utah Legislature on Thursday formally approved a merger between Utah State University and the College of Eastern Utah, a two-year institution, the Deseret News reported. The Utah Board of Regents endorsed the merger in December, and Utah State has already begun the process of searching for a new chancellor for Eastern Utah.
March 5, 2010
Twenty-one veterinary students and employees at Colorado State University were exposed to the plague last year when they examined a dead mountain lion, The Denver Post reported. Those exposed did not contract the plague, but the incident revealed a gap in the university's insurance policies, which are now being revised.
March 5, 2010
Ashland University said Thursday that it would acquire the nursing school run by a nearby hospital system and absorb it into its own nursing program. Under the agreement, which would take effect July 1, Ashland would take over the MedCentral College of Nursing, now part of MedCentral Health System of Mansfield, and create its own College of Nursing, operating both on its home campus and at MedCentral's current site, in Mansfield.
March 4, 2010
Leaders of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church voted Wednesday to fire most of the board of Erskine College, the church's only college, according to unofficial notes taken by some at the meeting and an account in The Index-Journal, a South Carolina newspaper.
March 4, 2010
Two Toyota managers have resigned from an advisory board for an automotive technology program at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale after a professor there criticized the company at a Congressional hearing about the auto manufacturer's safety issues, Bloomberg reported. University officials said that Toyota had indicated that it would have liked to review the professor's work before it was presented to Congress.

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