Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 5, 2009
Bob Davies, vice president for university relations at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, has been chosen as president of Eastern Oregon University.
May 5, 2009
Not everyone would willingly choose to become the public face of the debt-ridden. Alan Collinge didn't exactly choose to do so, defaulting on $38,000 in student loans only after a series of missteps and strokes of misfortune, but he has embraced his situation with gusto, founding StudentLoanJustice.org to advocate for distressed borrowers and now writing a book, The Student Loan Scam (Beacon Press).
May 4, 2009
U. of Colorado ends funding for independent newspaper for employees, citing dire budget situation.
May 4, 2009
The mayor and some city council members in Providence are floating a proposal to tax students at private colleges $150 each per semester, The Providence Journal reported. The city is facing a large budget deficit. Like local lawmakers elsewhere who urge private colleges to make payments in lieu of property taxes from which they are exempt as nonprofit, Providence officials argue that private college students add to city costs.
May 4, 2009
This year's commencement season has already seen the University of Notre Dame and other Roman Catholic colleges questioned by church leaders over appearances by President Obama and others who are defenders of abortion rights. In a new twist, a Catholic colleges is being criticized by a bishop for having a speaker who is anti-abortion, but not sufficiently so. Bishop Joseph F.
May 4, 2009
Susan Kelly has left the presidency of Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, a Los Angeles institution known for its programs to educate minority and disadvantaged students in the health sciences. The Los Angeles Wave reported that Kelly was ousted amid growing criticism of the university's financial condition and the administration's response to budget problems.
May 4, 2009
The mysterious donor providing multi-million dollar gifts to colleges and universities led by women has moved beyond the lower 48. The donor has provided the University of Alaska at Anchorage with $7 million. As with the other gifts that have colleges wondering who the donor is, the conditions attached are that the university not attempt to identify the benefactor, and that the funds be used for financial aid.
May 1, 2009
Thursday was declared to be New Faculty Majority Day and featured events at many campuses, particularly in California, designed to draw attention to the poor working conditions faced by adjuncts. Also Thursday, the Modern Language Association released its Academic Workforce Advocacy Kit, which provides departmen
May 1, 2009
Wayne Watson, the retiring president of the City Colleges of Chicago, was named Thursday as the next president of Chicago State University, and the selection was greeted with boos and criticism, the Chicago Tribune reported. While Watson has had some successes in his current job, he clashed with professors, especially during a strike in 2005.
May 1, 2009
Authorities in Japan are searching for Craig Arnold, an award-winning poet and assistant professor of English at the University of Wyoming. Arnold has been missing since Sunday, when he disappeared while visiting a volcano site on the island of Kuchinoerabu-jima. Arnold has been working on a book about volcanoes and maintaining a blog about his visits.

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