Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

December 10, 2009
Preliminary study suggests that after steep drop in last half of 2008, college investments edged upward in first half of 2009. Overall decline in rate of return -- 19 percent -- would be biggest in 35 years.
December 10, 2009
Mikita Brottman bemoans the lost art of the creative syllabus, and what it says about our colleges and their students.
December 9, 2009
Rita Hartung Cheng, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, has been named chancellor of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.Gregory J. Hamann, president of Clatsop Community College, in Oregon, has been selected as president of Linn-Benton Community College, also in Oregon.George W.
December 9, 2009
Several colleges that have been experiencing high profile financial difficulties received bad news this week from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The accreditor placed Greensboro College on warning status, and Lambuth University on probation. Notre Dame Seminary, in Louisiana, was also placed on probation. The Southern accrediting group has responsibility for the region with most of the historically black colleges -- and sometimes has disputes with those institutions.
December 9, 2009
Appropriators from the U.S. House and Senate reached agreement Tuesday on a compromise spending bill that would finance education, labor, health, science and other federal programs for the 2010 fiscal year.
December 9, 2009
A student fired a rifle at a math instructor in class Tuesday at Northern Virginia Community College, but there were no injuries, The Washington Post reported. According to authorities, the student fired two shots as the instructor shouted for other students to duck, and the shooter then went into the hallway and waited without incident for police to arrive.
December 9, 2009
With about 200 protesting workers in attendance, and facing charges of allowing wasteful spending, the board of the San Jose/Evergreen Community College District on Tuesday backed off a layoff plan that would have cost more than 100 jobs, The San Jose Mercury News reported.
December 9, 2009
Northeastern University will today announce an adjustment to its famous co-op program -- in which students mix extended semesters in a work environment along with traditional coursework -- that will allow students to complete the program in four years instead of five, The Boston Globe reported. Students in the four-year program will take some courses online and will have two six-month work experiences instead of three.
December 9, 2009
The University of Oxford has announced new procedures for electing its prized professorship in poetry, The Guardian reported. All 300,000 Oxford graduates are entitled to vote, but until now, they had to show up at a specified time and place to do so, limiting participation. Under the new rules, people will be able to vote in person or online -- and over a longer time period.
December 9, 2009
Students at the University of Alabama worried about juggling academic responsibilities with attending the national championship of college football can rest easy. The Crimson Tide will be playing in Pasadena, Cal., on Jan. 7, and classes were scheduled to resume at Alabama after the mid-year break on Jan. 6. The university has decided to call off all classes Jan. 6-8, so there will be no conflicts, The Tuscaloosa News reported.

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