Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

April 17, 2009
Some professors at Florida International University are planning to hand deliver a copy of the university's sexual harassment policy to Isiah Thomas as basketball coach, The New York Times reported. Thomas was at the center of a sexual harassment suit in which a federal jury awarded $11 million, and professors are raising questions about the message the university is sending about harassment by hiring him.
April 16, 2009
Protesters disrupted a speech Tuesday at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by former Rep. Tom Tancredo, a leader of the movement to limit benefits to those who do not have the legal right to live in the United States. Video posted on YouTube shows the incident, which led Tancredo to stop his talk. Holden Thorp, chancellor at Chapel Hill, called Tancredo to apologize for the incident Friday.
April 16, 2009
Valley City State University, facing an evacuation order due to flooding in North Dakota, will finish the semester with online instruction only. An announcement by Steven Shirley, the president, said that faculty members have been asked to be "flexible and creative" in finding ways to finish up courses. Valley City was one of the first colleges to give all students laptops, and it makes extensive use of technology in courses.
April 16, 2009
Sallie Mae, which as the country's largest student loan provider has a lot to lose from the Obama administration's proposal to eliminate the Family Federal Education Loan Program, is floating an alternative that would save the program but cut its costs significantly.
April 16, 2009
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute on Wednesday invited nearly 200 institutions to compete for $85 million in grants aimed at stimulating more innovative approaches to teaching science. To supplement the Maryland medical institute's standard science education program, it is offering supplemental grants this year designed to encourage more experimentation with curricular and teaching methods.
April 16, 2009
Washington and Lee University has announced the return of a book to its library -- 52,858 days late. The book wasn't actually borrowed, but was taken by a Union soldier during the Civil War, when troops moved through Lexington, Va. in 1864. From an inscription written by the soldier, it appears that he thought he was taking the book from the library of the Virginia Military Institute (which is a neighbor to Washington and Lee). The book -- the first volume of W.F.P.
April 16, 2009
Student cheating, a common problem when it comes to American students, is complicated further when students cross cultures and ethical boundaries, sessions at registrars' meeting reveal.
April 15, 2009
As Europe looks enviously at U.S. research productivity, economists examine which policy changes are likely to spur innovation. (Hint: Autonomous universities and competition for funds.)
April 15, 2009
In two votes -- one for those on the tenure track and one for adjuncts -- faculty members at Montana State University at Bozeman have voted to unionize. The professors will be represented in separate units, but both are affiliated with the joint American Federation of Teachers-National Education Association state affiliate, which already represents faculty members in the rest of public higher education in the state.
April 15, 2009
Free Exchange on Campus has released a detailed critique of David Horowitz's new book, One Party Classroom, which identifies what Horowitz considers the 150 worst courses in the United States. As with previous Horowitz writing, much of the book is focused on previous writing by Horowitz and a review of course syllabuses.

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