Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

February 9, 2010
Federal appeals court sides sweepingly with female former athletes who sued U. of California-Davis.
February 9, 2010
The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a complaint with Fresno City College, charging that a health instructor is giving religious instruction with an anti-gay bias, in violation of the separation of church and state, the Associated Press reported. The instructor could not be reached for comment and the college says only that it is investigating.
February 9, 2010
Many prospective students and their families lack the information they need to make informed choices about colleges, according to a report being issued today, "Planning for College: A Consumer Approach to the Higher Education Marketplace." The report examines the kinds of decisions families make and the information they need.
February 9, 2010
The University of Georgia has fired an employee whose job was to monitor and report students and faculty members who violate university policy to illegally download copyrighted material. The Athens Banner-Herald reported that the official has been charged with extortion for telling a student he caught downloading that he would not report her in return for cash.
February 9, 2010
Kaplan University and the California Community Colleges system have entered into an arrangement that will allow students at the two-year institutions to take individual online courses through Kaplan at a steep discount to help them finish their associate degrees. Under the deal, which is designed in part to help students at the two-year colleges deal with reduced course availability because of budget cuts, Kaplan will offer individual courses at a 42 percent discount from what they would normally cost as part of a degree program.
February 8, 2010
The College Art Association is the latest academic association to report significant declines in available faculty jobs. The association's career center (which doesn't have all art faculty jobs, but which is a good tool for measuring the job market) listed 1,263 positions in the 2009 fiscal year, a decline of 28 percent from the year before.
February 8, 2010
Eastern colleges seeking to increase their Latino enrollments are starting to add admissions materials and programs in Spanish, the Associated Press reported. Bryn Mawr College started a Spanish version of its Web site. And the University of Pennsylvania is conducting some college admissions sessions in Spanish. Officials said that these efforts are in large part about reaching the families of prospective students, who play an important part in students' college decisions.
February 8, 2010
Whether the great blizzard of 2010 was a fun adventure, a distracting annoyance or some of each all depends on where in mid-Atlantic higher education you sit.
February 8, 2010
The Christian Legal Society is attracting wide support -- particularly from religious organizations -- in its U.S. Supreme Court battle over whether public colleges and universities can enforce their anti-bias rules against religious groups. In December, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case involving the society's chapter at the Hastings College of Law of the University of California.
February 8, 2010
Organizers of the Secular Students of Concordia are trying to get officials of the Minnesota college to reconsider their refusal to recognize the organization, The Fargo-Moorhead Forum reported. College officials said that they could not recognize a group committed to ideals that conflict with those of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, with which the college is affiliated.

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