Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 11, 2010
The University of North Carolina System Board of Governors has adopted new limits on "retreat rights," payments to departing campus chancellors to help them adjust to a return to teaching, The Charlotte Observer reported. Some political leaders in the state have been outraged by reports that some officials have received these payments -- based on their senior administrative salaries -- and then retired rather than returning to teaching.
January 11, 2010
Members of Congress have been drawing attention to conflicts of interest between biomedical researchers whose research is useful to companies that pay them to consult. Jonathan Gruber, a health economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is facing a different kind of allegation, The Boston Globe reported.
January 8, 2010
With British universities facing deep budget cuts, some leading research universities are proposing that the government support doctoral education only when students are enrolled in highly ranked departments, Times Higher Education reported. Those advocating the change say that it will preserve the quality of the best programs, while critics are shouting that the idea is elitist and will squelch younger programs with great potential.
January 8, 2010
Colleges and universities in Taiwan plan to recruit and enroll top students from China, the Associated Press reported. Under a government proposal, students from 40 leading Chinese universities will be able to apply to study at one of Taiwan's colleges.
January 7, 2010
The American Historical Association kicks off its annual meeting today, in San Diego, amid signs that it will be the latest disciplinary group to see a significant drop in attendance. AHA officials stress that they get hundreds of on-site registrations most years, sometimes even 1,000. But as of Jan. 1, 3,705 people had pre-registered. That's down from 5,400 last year (a meeting held in New York City, considered a major draw, and 4,366 the year before, in Washington.
January 7, 2010
The Obama administration on Wednesday announced a series of new and expanded efforts -- many involving colleges and universities -- aimed at producing thousands of new math and science teachers over the next decade. President Obama drew attention to the initiatives as part of the "Educate to Innovate" campaign that he introduced last fall.
January 7, 2010
Weeks after a judge threw out key charges in a case alleging inappropriate ties between a former state legislator and a Florida community college, prosecutors on Wednesday filed aggressive new criminal charges against the lawmaker and the college's former president, The Miami Herald reported.
January 7, 2010
Yale University has announced a gift of $8,888,888 to help build a new campus for the business school. The gift is from Lei Zhang, who earned his M.B.A. there, and who selected the size of the gift because eight is considered a lucky number if Chinese cultures.
January 7, 2010
Tired of watching the United States and other countries woo its best scientists away, China is increasingly fighting to keep them, The New York Times reports. The newspaper focuses on the recent luring of Shi Yigong, a Princeton University biologist who turned down a big grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to return to become a dean at Tsinghua University in Beijing.
January 7, 2010
As colleges' plead for help, governor proposes constitutional amendment to ensure public universities get at least 10 percent of state funds. Plan is a long shot, but a symbolic boost.

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