Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 7, 2009
With summer jobs much more difficult for students to find, some colleges are hiring more students than in previous years for summer work on campus, USA Today reported. Saint John's University, in Minnesota, created 80 such jobs, most involving physical labor such as painting dormitory rooms, while the College of Wooster, in Ohio, hired more than 200 students for summer work, nearly triple the number hired most summers, the newspaper said.
July 7, 2009
The National Institutes of Health on Monday published final guidelines governing federal sponsorship of research on embryonic stem cells, rules that will have the effect of expanding scientists' access to existing stem cell lines and setting clear boundaries for creating eligible lines going forward.
July 7, 2009
George Washington University is planning to increase, to 10 percent from 6 percent, the share of its $1 billion endowment invested in farms, Bloomberg reported. The news service quoted one of the university's analysts as saying that the fund already has farm investments in Latin America and Eastern Europe and is now looking to Australia.
July 7, 2009
The number of colleges participating in the new Post-9/11 GI Bill’s Yellow Ribbon Program continues to climb. The program allows colleges to enter into matching agreements with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs to cover charges over and above those provided for under the base GI Bill benefit.
July 7, 2009
New research from the University of Michigan finds that college students with depression are twice as likely as their classmates to drop out. The research also indicates that lower grade-point averages depended on a student’s type of depression. There are two core symptoms of depression — loss of interest and pleasure in activities, or depressed mood — but only loss of interest is associated with lower grade-point averages.
July 7, 2009
Franklin College, in Indiana, filed a complaint in federal court Monday seeking to stop Franklin University -- an Ohio institution that has opened a campus in Indiana -- from using the Franklin name in ways that the college considers confusing and an infringement on its trademark. Franklin College's president James Moseley issued a statement in which he said that many people who have seen the university's "advertising blitz" have been confused about whether the college was changing its mission.
July 7, 2009
Education Department office for resolving disputes is staffed by company that also does loan collections for the agency, a potential conflict that troubles student borrowers.
July 6, 2009
In theory, move to digital textbooks will help the visually impaired. But advocates say college experiments violate law because digital readers aren't accessible to the blind.
July 6, 2009
The ever-growing University of Illinois admissions scandal has now reached athletics. Many big-time athletics programs face controversy over their requests that admissions officers let in athletes with less than stellar academic credentials.
July 6, 2009
Mark Drummond, chancellor of the Los Angeles Community College District, took an unexpected leave last month and on Thursday announced that he was resigning, effective July 31. Drummond is midway through a four-year contract and no reason was given for his sudden departure. Drummond was chancellor of the district from 1999 to 2004 and then left to become chancellor of the state's community college district. He returned in 2007, saying that he really wanted to return to the Los Angeles job.

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