Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 6, 2009
A state judge has dismissed a lawsuit challenging the University of Colorado Board of Regents' ban on carrying concealed weapons on the system's campuses, The Colorado Springs Gazette reported. The suit was brought by three students who said that relevant state law protected their right to carry concealed weapons. But the judge ruled that their legal argument was based on a false assumption that the university system should be considered a locality.
May 6, 2009
In at least one way, this unusual admissions year is proving to be normal: For all the talk about how application surges would make it difficult to find spots, there are still plenty of colleges (at least 258 of them) that still have openings for the fall, and most of them still have financial aid, housing, and spaces for both freshmen and transfer students.
May 6, 2009
Graduate teaching assistants have voted to unionize, in locals affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers, at Central Michigan University and Florida State University. (The latter unit is also affiliated with the National Education Association.) The votes were overwhelming at both campuses: 152-21 at Central Michigan and 448-140 at Florida State.
May 6, 2009
Last month, the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities in New York named Laura L. Anglin -- New York State's budget director -- as its next president. Anglin takes office in July at CICU, which has historically been an influential player in Albany with work on behalf of the state's private colleges.
May 6, 2009
Trustees of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion announced a plan Tuesday that would keep open all three American campuses of the institution, the seminary and primary educational institution of Reform Judaism, The Cincinnati Enquirer reported. Earlier plans suggested that only one campus might remain of those currently in Cincinnati, Los Angeles and New York.
May 6, 2009
The Wall Street Journal is publishing 10 essays by college presidents -- with the topics coming from their institutions' essay questions for applicants. So if you always wanted to know the person who has most influenced the lives of the presidents of Grinnell, Oberlin, or Vassar Colleges, or Wesleyan University; or how Barnard College's president thinks about the daily routine, or how Reed College's president experienced diversity, this is your chance.
May 5, 2009
Buzz began building last week that Amazon was planning a major announcement in New York this week, potentially with a higher education theme.
May 5, 2009
A new deal has emerged to save the College of Santa Fe, a private college that has been on the verge of going under. Under the latest plan, announced by New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, the City of Santa Fe, with help from the state, will purchase the campus and lease it to Laureate Education Inc., a for-profit organization, which will operate the campus.
May 5, 2009
California's work safety agency has fined the University of California at Los Angeles $31,000 for three "serious" violations of state regulations that came to light in an investigation of a the fatal burning of a research assistant in a December fire, the Los Angeles Times reported. The agency found that the lab assistant who died was never properly trained and was not wearing protective clothing at the time of the fire in a chemistry lab.
May 5, 2009
The Jesuit School of Theology will merge with Santa Clara University, the two institutions announced Monday. The theology school will keep its campus in Berkeley, and will maintain its ties with other theological schools there, but will also become part of Santa Clara, which is a Jesuit institution.

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