Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 22, 2009
The Institute for Higher Education Leadership & Policy at California State University at Sacramento released a report Wednesday, urging community college educators to make better use of data to improve the outcome of their students.
October 22, 2009
Saint Leo University, in Florida, has been punished by the National Collegiate Athletic Association for major violations by its cross country and swimming programs.
October 22, 2009
Charley Cooper, a Georgetown University sophomore whose ad for a personal assistant has attracted attention (much of it mocking) on blogs and here at Inside Higher Ed, has come forth to defend himself. Cooper told The Washington Post that he was very busy, and was just trying to get things done.
October 22, 2009
The accountability movement has hit human resources, as departments develop new ways to measure performance -- and potentially productivity -- of campus faculty and staff.
October 21, 2009
Richard H. Herman announced his resignation Tuesday as chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Herman was faulted by many on campus -- and by a special state review -- for enabling and participating in a since-disbanded system that gave preferential admissions to politically connected applicants. While Herman said that he sought to minimize such activity and to advance the university's political interests, a reconstituted board was conducting a review of whether he should stay on.
October 21, 2009
First-year medical enrollments are up 2 percent over last year, the Association of American Medical Colleges announced Tuesday. Half of that increase comes from the start of operations of four new medical schools, and half from increased enrollments at older institutions. Twelve medical schools -- responding to projections of a doctor shortage -- increased their class size by 7 percent or more for those entering this fall. Data released by the AAMC also show that:
October 21, 2009
Big-time sports programs appear to be moderating their spending slightly, although the vast majority of programs continue to operate in the red, according to a National Collegiate Athletic Association report released Tuesday. The report showed that median revenues at Division I colleges outpaced expenses in 2008, and that expenses were about even with revenues during the three-year period from 2006 to 2008.
October 21, 2009
The Federal Reserve on Wednesday proposed new regulations to govern the marketing of credit cards to college students. The rules, which were published in the Federal Register, would carry out changes to the Truth in Lending Act that Congress made as part of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009, which was designed to give consumers more protections from the practices of credit card companies.
October 21, 2009
Geert Wilders, an anti-Islamic Dutch politician, was escorted from a stage at Temple University Tuesday night, cutting short a question period when some in the audience started to shout jeers at him, the Associated Press reported. The talk was sponsored by the David Horowitz Freedom Center.
October 21, 2009
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, a watchdog group, has issued a report strongly backing Rick Steiner, who has accused federal officials of getting him removed from receiving funds from the National Sea Grant Program and his administrators at the University of Alaska of going along with the decision and failing to stand behind his academic freedom.

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