Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 26, 2009
The Dalai Lama has offered to donate $100,000 to help Florida International University raise other money to stave off the elimination of its religious studies department, the Miami Herald reported. The department is one of many programs and degrees facing elimination because of state budget cuts, and Nathan M. Katz, a professor who is trying to save the department, who has known the Dalai Lama since studying in India in 1973, wrote him asking for help.
May 26, 2009
Israel's Supreme Court on Monday ruled that the country's military could continue to use non-security related criteria to deny visas to Palestinians seeking to enroll at Israeli universities, but that students denied visas have the right to a court hearing, The Jerusalem Post reported.
May 26, 2009
William Ayers, the one-time Weather Underground leader who has become a leading education researcher at the University of Illinois at Chicago, has again been barred from Canada. Over the years, Ayers has visited Canada many times, but was turned away in January when he was trying to go to the University of Toronto to give an invited talk.
May 26, 2009
College towns are faring much better than other localities in the current economic climate, according to an analysis in Forbes. The magazine reported that while the total number of jobs in the United States decreased by 3.5 percent from March 2008 to March 2009, 62 college towns experienced job growth.
May 26, 2009
White House poised to tap former Republican lawmaker from Iowa to head humanities endowment; Leach endorsed Obama and co-founded Congressional Humanities Caucus.
May 22, 2009
House hearing elicits widespread agreement that big changes are coming, and that a single federal loan program would make sense. But left unanswered: Is administration's plan clearly the best option?
May 22, 2009
Darrel D. Colson, provost and dean at Centenary College, in Louisiana, has been chosen as president of Wartburg College, in Iowa.Sharon L.
May 22, 2009
How could things get worse in California, where voter rejection of a series of budget measures Tuesday has left public higher education planning for deep budget cuts? Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Republican, could go after the state's student aid program -- and the Los Angeles Times reported that is a serious possibility. According to the newspaper, the governor is considering a plan to eliminate new CalGrants.
May 22, 2009
For months, Texas legislators have been lobbied about the state's "10 percent" admissions law, which admits all high school graduates in the state who are in the top 10 percent of their classes to the public institution of their choice. The University of Texas at Austin wants to limit the law, because too large a share of its freshman class is admitted that way. Advocates for minority students want to preserve the law, saying it has brought diversity to higher education.
May 22, 2009
The Global Campus of the University of Illinois, an online program that has been controversial with faculty members, has had sufficiently disappointing enrollment numbers that the university's board this week approved major revisions in the program.

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