Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 14, 2010
Lois B. DeFleur will retire this summer as president of the State University of New York at Binghamton. During her 19 years leading the campus, its competitiveness in admissions has skyrocketed and its academic reputation has grown. DeFleur also encouraged the growth of international initiatives.
January 14, 2010
The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday heard an apparel company's challenge to the National Football League's business practices -- a case that could have implications for the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which filed a friend of the court brief supporting the NFL in the case. The lawsuit in question, which was brought by a company called American Needle, revolves around whether the NFL can operate as a single business entity or whether it is made of of 32 individual companies (its teams).
January 14, 2010
Delaware State University has announced that it is eliminating its men's tennis and women's equestrian teams, The News Journal reported. The university said that its overall athletic budget of $12 million is the largest among members of its conference, the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, and that the cuts would save about $700,000.
January 14, 2010
The University of Hudderfield is investigating two students who are alleged to have created "Hitler - the Drinking Game" on Facebook, The Yorkshire Evening Post reported. The Facebook group explaining the rules (removed once the university investigation started) attracted 12,000 members. The student founders were known as "Fuhrers," and the game involved cards set in the shape of swastikas.
January 14, 2010
Despite well-publicized expansions of aid, public research universities have made too little progress in expanding representation of low-income and minority students, report asserts.
January 14, 2010
By urging mandated bachelor’s degrees for nurses, Carnegie Foundation’s important new report risks polarizing nursing education community, writes Beverly Malone.
January 13, 2010
As 3 football coaches lose jobs for mistreating players, have the rules about acceptable behavior -- and the balance of power in college sports -- changed?
January 13, 2010
The U.S. Education Department should reject Louisiana's request to be exempted from a provision in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act that requires states to maintain their spending on education to receive federal stimulus funds, the head of the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education said in a letter to Education Secretary Arne Duncan.
January 13, 2010
The University of System of Maryland is appealing for reconsideration by the Maryland Higher Education Commission of a decision to block an online degree program in community college administration because it might compete with an in-person program at Morgan State University, The Baltimore Sun reported.
January 13, 2010
Many at Boston College are concerned about a proposal to outsource the overtime work performed by some facilities workers, The Boston Globe reported. College officials say that by saving money, jobs will be preserved, but many faculty members see the shift as a first step to a more corporate model that they fear would conflict with Roman Catholic values and lead to outsourcing -- and the elimination of jobs or job security -- for more workers.

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