Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

April 24, 2009
ITT Educational Services, a chain of for-profit colleges, has bought Daniel Webster College, a non-profit college in New Hampshire, The Nashua Telegraph reported. College officials said that the purchase would allow for investments that would improve programs. ITT said it would keep the college's curriculum and employees, and hoped to expand the institution.
April 24, 2009
Brandeis University has been trying to calm the many supporters of the Rose Art Museum -- whose collection the university originally planned to sell -- that all was well while officials reconsidered the museum's future. A recent letter from the university said that the museum remained open and functioning. It turns out that those closest to the museum disagree. The Board of Overseers issued a statement Thursday noting that the collection now lacks a director or curator.
April 24, 2009
The American Association of University Professors on Thursday reiterated its view that colleges must not bar controversial speakers from campus. Noting recent incidents in which colleges have rescinded invitations, the AAUP said that this was antithetical to academic freedom.
April 24, 2009
The anonymous donor is back -- this time with $10 million for Michigan State University, most of which will be designated for financial aid.
April 24, 2009
Linda Bunnell announced Thursday that she is resigning on May 31 as chancellor of the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. Her note to the campus did not reference recent controversies, but she has been involved in several conflicts with the institution's fund raising arm. In addition, she recently admitted to leaving the scene of an accident after she hit another car while driving a state vehicle.
April 24, 2009
University of Connecticut students are angry about an art exhibit in the main library and are pushing to have it moved. The Hartford Courant reported that students object to works created by Randall Nelson, a sculptor known for his work with dead birds.
April 23, 2009
Madonna Constantine has sued Teachers College of Columbia University for $200 million.
April 23, 2009
A lawsuit has accused William Meehan, president of Jacksonville State University, of plagiarizing portions of his dissertation. The Associated Press reported that a Jacksonville State professor is suing Meehan in a dispute over ownership of a collection of plant samples, and included the plagiarism charges to establish a pattern in which Meehan is alleged to take work produced by others. The AP reviewed the dissertation and the work supposedly copied and found similarities.
April 23, 2009
Trinity College, in Connecticut, is facing scrutiny from the state attorney general over its use of an endowment that was created by a donor for one purpose but that apparently was used for other programs as well, The Wall Street Journal reported. According to the article, the funds were designated for use for a business professorship and the donor specifically stated that he didn't want to give general discretion to the college to use the endowment income for other areas.
April 23, 2009
Hundreds of scientists and their supporters held a rally at the University of California at Los Angeles to back the right of researchers to use animals in their studies and to oppose increasingly violent attacks on professors, the Los Angeles Times reported. While many scientists have been angry at the tactics of the more extreme parts of the animal rights movement, the UCLA protest was an unusually public response.

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