Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

December 10, 2009
Three students started a hunger strike at Vassar College Tuesday, while other students organized a sing-in -- all designed to get the institution to reverse a decision to eliminate the jobs of 13 staff members, The Poughkeepsie Journal reported. The students say that the jobs can be preserved.
December 10, 2009
Webster University and Eden Theological Seminary, its neighbor in St. Louis, announced an agreement Wednesday that is designed to dramatically step up the collaboration between the two institutions. Under the arrangement, Webster will pay Eden $5.3 million in exchange for a 5.5 acre parcel of land and three buildings, including its library. The seminary's holdings will then be integrated into Webster's library, to which Eden students and employees will have access.
December 10, 2009
The University of Ottawa has become the first Canadian institution to join the Compact for Open Access Publishing Equity, in which five leading American universities in September pledged to develop systems to pay open access journals for the articles they publish by the institutions' scholars.
December 10, 2009
Antioch College's continued rebirth took another step forward Wednesday with the naming of an interim president, Matthew Derr, who has been serving as chief transition officer. Derr, formerly vice president for institutional advancement at the Boston Conservatory, will now oversee the restoration of the facilities, the hiring of key staff members, and fund-raising efforts.
December 10, 2009
The Oklahoma Supreme Court has ruled that Oklahoma State University was within its rights to use eminent domain to obtain the last piece of land needed to build a new athletic complex, the Associated Press reported.
December 10, 2009
New research has found that British universities favor research over teaching when evaluating candidates for promotion, The Times Higher reported. In many cases, the research found that universities don't even consider teaching in a substantial way or document how it is evaluated.
December 10, 2009
Preliminary study suggests that after steep drop in last half of 2008, college investments edged upward in first half of 2009. Overall decline in rate of return -- 19 percent -- would be biggest in 35 years.
December 10, 2009
Mikita Brottman bemoans the lost art of the creative syllabus, and what it says about our colleges and their students.
December 9, 2009
Rita Hartung Cheng, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, has been named chancellor of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.Gregory J. Hamann, president of Clatsop Community College, in Oregon, has been selected as president of Linn-Benton Community College, also in Oregon.George W.
December 9, 2009
Several colleges that have been experiencing high profile financial difficulties received bad news this week from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The accreditor placed Greensboro College on warning status, and Lambuth University on probation. Notre Dame Seminary, in Louisiana, was also placed on probation. The Southern accrediting group has responsibility for the region with most of the historically black colleges -- and sometimes has disputes with those institutions.

Pages

Back to Top