Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

December 23, 2009
Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania has pledged to improve the women's softball field and provide additional funds for women's athletics to settle a reopened lawsuit under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported.
December 23, 2009
An Ethiopian court has sentenced a Bucknell University professor to death, but the sentence was in absentia as the professor is at Bucknell, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. The professor is Berhanu Nega, who teaches economics.
December 23, 2009
The British government has urged universities to develop "fast track" college degrees that could be finished in two years instead of the traditional three, The Guardian reported. Government officials said such degrees could save money both for students and the government. University and student groups are skeptical of the idea.
December 22, 2009
"My Lazy American Students," an op-ed in The Boston Globe, is attracting considerable online debate. The piece -- by Kara Miller, who teaches history and rhetoric at Babson College -- compares her American and foreign students.
December 22, 2009
Sen. Christopher Dodd, a Connecticut Democrat, managed to insert a provision in the Senate's version of health care legislation that would provide $100 million for a university hospital that he hopes will be the one at the University of Connecticut, The Hartford Courant reported. The provision was written without identifying UConn.
December 22, 2009
The National Institutes of Health is planning to propose new rules for researchers receiving its grants, requiring that they disclose financial ties to medical entities and barring them from publishing articles that are "ghostwritten" by drug company officials, USA Today reported. The proposed rules follow Congressional inquiries into reports of conflicts of interest by some prominent biomedical researchers.
December 22, 2009
An adjunct humanities professor has sued the president of Edison Community College, in Ohio, over the president’s refusal to rehire him because he videotaped a contentious board meeting. Quincy Essinger filed a complaint in federal court against Kenneth A.
December 22, 2009
The University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa already is on record in favor of skipping a few days of classes to allow students to attend the national championship of college football. Football, it seems, also trumps the legal system.
December 22, 2009
Ain Shams University, in Cairo, has announced that it will appeal a court ruling allowing its female students to wear a full face veil - the niqab - in campus dormitories, AFP reported. Many Egyptian educators have opposed the wearing of the niqab on campus, and another court ruling is expected soon on a university ban on the niqab during exams.
December 21, 2009
The large tuition increases have led to many student protests, but now parents are mobilizing as well, the Los Angeles Times reported. Rallies and other efforts have taken place and are being organized to reach lawmakers. While university officials tend to say that they have added financial aid to help those unable to pay the added costs, many families don't feel that the additional aid is enough or will reach them.

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