Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 1, 2009
Caribbean medical school's suit against Arkansas agency takes larger aim at whether accreditors and state boards discriminate against foreign trained doctors.
April 30, 2009
James Birge, executive vice president and chief operating officer at Wheeling Jesuit University, in West Virginia, has been appointed as president of Franklin Pierce University, in New Hampshire.Linda Eisenmann, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of education and history at John Carroll University, in Ohio, has been selected as provost at Wheaton College, in Massachusetts
April 30, 2009
The U.S. Justice Department has indicted several men for their alleged involvement in a broad scheme in which thousands of colleges were bombarded with spam e-mail used to sell millions of dollars of products to their students, the U.S. attorney for the Western District of Missouri announced Wednesday.
April 30, 2009
The U.S. Education Department's inspector general on Wednesday released the latest in a series of highly critical audits of the department's oversight of lenders and guarantee agencies in the Federal Family Education Loan Program.
April 30, 2009
Gov. Timothy Kaine of Virginia said officials there will investigate how a unit of the state police came to conclude that several religious and historically black colleges in the state were nodes for radicals and potential terrorists, as it suggested in a leaked report, The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk reported.
April 30, 2009
Britain's student admissions service is reconsidering requirements that students must report certain criminal convictions when applying to universities. The Guardian reported that the reconsideration follows its reports on an applicant to medical school who was confused about whether he had to report a burglary conviction from his youth.
April 30, 2009
Sports programs in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's upper echelon saw their operating budgets grow by 11 percent a year, more than doubling the average rise in spending by their institutions, according to a new NCAA study, USA Today reported.
April 30, 2009
An article in The Wall Street Journal reports on the best and worst approaches (from would-be students' perspective) to college rejection letters. Mount Allison University, in New Brunswick, wins praise for adding handwritten notes to all rejection letters, offering specific advice on areas of academic weakness, so students may understand the process.
April 29, 2009
California veterans will be eligible for up to… $0 to cover their tuition under the new GI Bill. The figure, recently updated, is a striking reflection of the frustration many have had with the separation of tuition from fees in the process of calculating veterans’ educational benefits. The maximum benefits payable to veterans vary (pretty dramatically) by state, and are based on the highest resident, undergraduate public tuition and fees (respectively) charged in a state.
April 29, 2009
Due to growing concerns about swine flu, some universities have begun canceling study abroad programs in Mexico, including the University of Minnesota, which on Tuesday announced that the 21 students currently in Mexico were being advised to return home and that academic programs beginning in late May had been canceled (affecting 52 students).

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