Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 15, 2010
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has rejected an appeal of a lower court's ruling rejecting a challenge by advocates for some religious high schools to the admissions standards used by the University of California. The challenge came from schools that claim they are suffering discrimination based on their religious views (many of which do not involve belief in evolution).
January 15, 2010
State and local officials are talking about creating a new public campus -- perhaps a full-fledged college -- in Philadelphia, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. The city has a community college, Temple University and many private institutions, but the goal is to have a campus of the state system of higher education. The proponents of the plan say that the private institutions and Temple are too expensive for many low-income students who want a four-year degree.
January 14, 2010
Several American colleges are tracking down students and faculty members on programs or conducting research in Haiti, and the news was encouraging but incomplete Wednesday evening -- amid the devastation of the earthquake there:
January 14, 2010
A panel of librarians, library scientists, publishers and university leaders on Tuesday issued a report calling on federal agencies that fund research to create policies that provide free public access to the results of the research they fund "as soon as possible after those results have been published in a peer-reviewed journal." The Scholarly Publishing Roundtable was convened by the U.S.
January 14, 2010
In a settlement with the U.S. Justice Department, three universities agreed not to buy or promote the use of Amazon's Kindle DX or other electronic readers until the devices are fully accessible to the blind.
January 14, 2010
This is the time of year when most elite colleges announce yet another increase in applications, but the hike at the University of Chicago -- 42 percent -- is unusually large. The Chicago Tribune reported that officials cited a range of possible reasons, from increased outreach efforts to the publicity associated with President Obama having been a faculty member.
January 14, 2010
Labor supporters in Maryland are raising questions about the fairness of a state panel that recently issued a report calling for improvements in the treatment of teaching assistants and adjuncts at the state's colleges, but that largely punted on the question of unionization.
January 14, 2010
Lois B. DeFleur will retire this summer as president of the State University of New York at Binghamton. During her 19 years leading the campus, its competitiveness in admissions has skyrocketed and its academic reputation has grown. DeFleur also encouraged the growth of international initiatives.
January 14, 2010
The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday heard an apparel company's challenge to the National Football League's business practices -- a case that could have implications for the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which filed a friend of the court brief supporting the NFL in the case. The lawsuit in question, which was brought by a company called American Needle, revolves around whether the NFL can operate as a single business entity or whether it is made of of 32 individual companies (its teams).
January 14, 2010
Delaware State University has announced that it is eliminating its men's tennis and women's equestrian teams, The News Journal reported. The university said that its overall athletic budget of $12 million is the largest among members of its conference, the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, and that the cuts would save about $700,000.

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