Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

February 11, 2010
Baker University is eliminating five majors -- molecular bioscience, wildlife biology, computer information systems, physical education and political science. The Lawrence Journal-World reported that some courses will still be taught in these areas, and that eliminating these majors at the Kansas institution will save about $400,000.
February 11, 2010
A Wisconsin judge has ruled that the University of Wisconsin at Madison does not have to reveal the anonymous donor of $15 million for a new music facility, The Associated Press reported. The owner of a bar that is fighting to block the university's building plans sought a court order that would have allowed them to question the donors.
February 11, 2010
Ivor van Heerden, who was a leading whistle blower in the analysis of what went wrong after Katrina hit New Orleans, is suing Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge, charging that he was fired from his position at the university's hurricane research because of anger over his criticisms of the Army Corps of Engineers, The New Orleans Times-Picayune reported.
February 11, 2010
Gretchen Bataille announced Wednesday that she is leaving the presidency of the University of North Texas at the end of the month, stunning many on the campus. The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. Bataille was named to the position in 2006, and has been a forceful advocate for the institution's push to become a research university. Student leaders, who said that they considered her a strong ally, said they were concerned about the news. No explanation has been offered for the sudden resignation.
February 11, 2010
The University of Iowa has canceled a student-run theater's planned showing of a pornographic film this weekend, The Iowa City Press-Citizen reported. A spokesman said: "It is clearly not in the public interest for a public facility at a public institution to be showing a film of this nature. If showing the film were essential to an educational objective, the situation would be different. The intent in this case was to provide entertainment."
February 10, 2010
Calvin College has become the first institution covered by a new rule of the American Philosophical Association of requiring any college that violates any part of the association's anti-bias policy to have job listings with the association flagged. The rule was adopted late last year in response to the concerns of many philosophers about having their association list jobs from institutions that do not hire gay professors.
February 10, 2010
Illinois has indicted Michael Vernon Warren, the former director of publications and copy services at Chicago State University, charging him with a scheme in which the university overpaid for copy machines and paper purchased from a company he owned, The Chicago Tribune reported. State higher education regulations bar most purchases from businesses owned by university employees.
February 10, 2010
Between 1995 and 2003, the median accumulated federal loans for doctorates increased from $14,927 to $44,743, according to a study in The Journal of Higher Education. The study examines the increase and various factors that contributed to it, and to some subsets of doctoral students seeing debt increase at faster levels than was the case for others.
February 10, 2010
Two weeks after its rebirth, California agency to oversee private postsecondary education erroneously tells 50 institutions that they are approved to offer new programs.
February 9, 2010
Federal appeals court sides sweepingly with female former athletes who sued U. of California-Davis.

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