Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

November 15, 2005
Nearly every gathering of college officials these days reveals at least an undercurrent of concern, if not a full blown anxiety fest, about the public’s heightened scrutiny of and skepticism about higher education.
November 14, 2005
To make the case for U.S. aid, higher ed groups tally cost of colleges' Katrina cleanup: over $2 billion.
November 11, 2005
NCAA puts sports program on probation for violations committed by official charged with keeping the rules.
November 11, 2005
Republican leaders lack votes, for now, on budget package that would slash $14.3 billion from lenders and students.
November 10, 2005
NCAA drops Carthage and Midwestern State from list of colleges with "hostile" Native American imagery.
November 9, 2005
Knight Commission hears from 3 groups that take divergent approaches to the problems in college athletics.
November 8, 2005
Medical schools' technical standards complicate the legal picture for the institutions and students alike.
November 4, 2005
Anyone in search of a metaphor for the difficult financial and political situation facing American higher education had a slew to choose from at a conference on the business of higher education on Thursday. College officials are standing on a tightrope, said Stanley O. Ikenberry, trying to balance concurrent pressures to increase student access, control tuition and costs, and deal with declining financial support from governments and other traditional sources.

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