Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 8, 2009
Conventional wisdom has it that economic chaos prompts students to seek college programs that are highly practical and that yield sure job offers. But music programs are experiencing a surge in applications, the Chicago Tribune reported, even as jobs with orchestras and arts groups are increasingly hard to come by.
March 8, 2009
New York Medical College, a free-standing institution with 1,600 students in M.D., public health and other graduate medical sciences programs, has signed a letter of intent to merge with a university, but won't name the likely partner, The Journal News reported. A spokeswoman for Touro College, while not confirming that it had signed a letter of intent, said that officials there were in "serious negotiations" with the medical college.
March 8, 2009
President Obama is expected today to announce that he is lifting limits, imposed by President George W. Bush, on federal support for stem cell research. The restrictions have been widely condemned by scientists as hindering research, and as symbolic of the Bush administration's imposition of ideological tests on science policy. The move by President Obama has been expected; during his campaign, he promised such a shift.
March 7, 2009
A large crowd greeted Richard Dawkins at the University of Oklahoma Friday, cheering on the biologist as he spoke about evolution and the attacks on science by creationists and others. Some legislators spoke out against the university's invitation to Dawkins.
March 7, 2009
Two Texas A&M University students -- who were brother and sister -- were shot and killed Friday in their off-campus apartment, and a student at nearby Blinn College has been charged with the murders, The Bryan/College Station Eagle reported.
March 6, 2009
The editorial staff of the Oregon Daily Emerald, which went on strike Wednesday in protest of organizational changes, plans to return to work and publish a newspaper today, the newspaper announced Friday.
March 6, 2009
The ex-professor and professor whose separate appearances on the college lecture circuit regularly cause controversies appeared together Thursday night -- to still more controversy. William Ayers -- the University of Illinois at Chicago professor who is regularly attacked for his past in the Weather Underground -- traveled to the University of Colorado at Boulder to speak with and on behalf of Ward Churchill, who lost his job teaching there when the university determined that he had engaged in repeated incidents of scholarly misconduct.
March 6, 2009
New York authorities on Thursday charged that the son of a University of Chicago professor engaged in identity theft and harassment of scholars with whom his father has a long-standing disagreement about the Dead Sea Scrolls, The New York Times reported. Raphael Golb is accused of creating e-mail accounts in which he pretended to be his father's scholarly critics, and of using those accounts to advance his father's theories.
March 6, 2009
Unlike (relative) drama of 2007 negotiations over accreditation, panel now debating changes in federal rules focuses on the mostly mundane.
March 5, 2009
This week at Dartmouth College started with the announcement that Jim Yong Kim would become the next president. The choice was well received on campus, while Asian American educators nationally hailed the news because Kim will expand the very small pool of Asian American presidents and will be the first one to lead an Ivy League institution.

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