Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe

Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe is a faculty brat with an enduring case of wanderlust. She spreads the contagion as associate director of the Office of Fellowships at Northwestern University, her undergraduate alma mater. She earned masters degrees in European history as a Marshall Scholar at Cambridge University before completing her doctorate in American history at Princeton. Beth perseveres as the lone source of estrogen in a household otherwise populated by rambunctious boys: her husband, two sons, and a border terrier. In her so-called spare time, she fights household entropy, gardens, bakes boozy bundts, enjoys breakfast in Bollywood, and writes scholarly papers about funky monks.

For more, visit http://elizabethlewispardoe.wordpress.com or find Elizabeth on Twitter@ejlp.

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Most Recent Articles

October 8, 2013
The spectacle of a Big Ten homecoming goes international and multi-cultural. 
August 27, 2013
Considering intellectual and emotional investments.
July 17, 2013
Ideas that could lift men and women.
June 11, 2013
One way to evaluate academics.
May 19, 2013
Film fantasies and educational fantasies.
March 24, 2013
Sheryl Sandberg advises women to “lean in;” the dangling preposition in her book title tells me that Sandberg offers little substance. She offers process without a predicate. Yes, I just judged a book by its cover.
February 20, 2013
My biological sons have some time yet before they will fly into adulthood. However, I have entered the second half of my seventh year as a fellowships adviser.  My first blog for UVenus explained my state of being as Mater de facto et de jure.  In 2010, I had yet to grasp the full impact of my de facto children would play as precursors to the triumphs and traumas of motherhood yet to come.
January 21, 2013
Earlier this month, the American Historical Association announced the anything-but-shocking discovery that tenured men benefit more from marriage than their female counterparts.  My female friends and I long ago noticed that women at the top of the academic hierarchy rarely have more than one child and a marriage in the present tense.  Scott Jaschik scrutinized the higher statistical propensity for academic women to form endogamous marriages with another Ph.D.  Academic men pick partners more willing or better able to fulfill Ruth’s biblical pledge, “whither thou goest, I shall go.”
November 20, 2012
As a result of some cosmic hiccup, I have to register my baby boy for high school this weekend. Then, one of his friends asked me to explain International Baccalaureate programs as I drove him home yesterday evening. Already in a state of middle-aged-maternal angst, I embarked upon a frenzy of IB research last night and this morning. The following paragraphs attempt to disambiguate my parental self-flagellation and pedagogical frustration from a fledgling proposal.
October 23, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court will soon rule (again) on so-called affirmative action in higher education. The details vary case to case, but the underlying fear that a person of color stripped a paler would-be pupil of an opportunity remains constant. Programs to guarantee underrepresented minorities presence in the academy make tempers - including mine - flare whether in support or rejection of their aims. I feel particularly prone to pique at this time of year. Accomplished students from privileged families apply for awards to study overseas funded by governments or foundations. They can, and they should. However, they should also remember that the rules apply to them.

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