Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe

Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe is a faculty brat with an enduring case of wanderlust. She spreads the contagion as associate director of the Office of Fellowships at Northwestern University, her undergraduate alma mater. She earned masters degrees in European history as a Marshall Scholar at Cambridge University before completing her doctorate in American history at Princeton. Beth perseveres as the lone source of estrogen in a household otherwise populated by rambunctious boys: her husband, two sons, and a border terrier. In her so-called spare time, she fights household entropy, gardens, bakes boozy bundts, enjoys breakfast in Bollywood, and writes scholarly papers about funky monks.

For more, visit http://elizabethlewispardoe.wordpress.com or find Elizabeth on Twitter@ejlp.

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Most Recent Articles

September 5, 2011
“Can't hang it on the wall for the world to see But you've got yourself a working man's Ph.D.” --Aaron Tippin, 1993 We are remodeling our house. This might not seem connected to a blog about international higher education. However, I come home each day for an update from our outstanding Irish carpenter and to marvel at the evidence of his higher education.
August 7, 2011
July 5, 2011
As the US basks in the afterglow of July 4th fireworks, NASA counts down to its final shuttle launch, and the budget battle consumes Congress, I submit a last-minute plea to save global research and education from the chopping block. Independence need not mean isolation. Indeed, independence demands knowledge of the world for its survival.
June 12, 2011
I suspect all our American readers know this passage from Robert Frost’s poem, “The Road Not Taken:” “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,I took the one less traveled by,And that has made all the difference.”
May 1, 2011
I work at a university on the quarter system. Complaint about quarters makes for constant campus conversation, but I remain strangely fond of the system. Their alignment with the seasons permits an academic poetry of which I approve.
April 3, 2011
Most readers of Inside Higher Ed know of the fracas that followed an x-rated, after-class demonstration for a psychology course at Northwestern. I was not there and leave it for others to judge whether Professor Bailey crossed a critical line between the educational and the exploitative. However, I think the international attention given the event reflects its perfect storm of academia’s greatest sensitivities.
March 16, 2011
“One baby, one book,” my adviser told me, when as an ambitious, twenty-three-year-old, Marshall Scholar at Cambridge University, I announced my impending marriage to the Briton who had fatefully sat across from me at our Clare College Matriculation lunch. As any woman visiting a website entitled, “University of Venus” knows, such tidily orchestrated plans never play out as expected.
March 1, 2011
In my role as a fellowships adviser, I have a motto: think laterally - not literally. “Tiger mothers” as described by Amy Chua enshrine literal thinking of the kind that dooms overachievers when tested outside the realm of the rote.
February 3, 2011
“What is a fellowship?” This question opened more conversations than I can count over the last four and a half years of my professional life, and it lacks a straightforward answer. Some ‘fellowships’ are in fact scholarships (Rhodes to study at Oxford; Gates to study at Cambridge). Others are grants (Fulbrights for independent projects) or funded internships (Junior Fellows at the Carnegie Foundation; Urban Fellows in New York City). All three categories and a multitude of additional permutations share a fundamental commitment to mentorship.
January 9, 2011
The Economist's 16 December issue opened its article on why doctoral degrees waste 21st century students' time and money with a vignette about Martin Luther. The Economist longed for the days when theses were short, sweet, and revolutionary. I began my own academic life as a historian of Lutheran education and could not avoid seeing the deeper parallels between 16th century and 21st century crises in education.

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