Eric Stoller

Eric Stoller is a higher education thought-leader, consultant, writer, and speaker. He frequently gives keynotes on how educators can use social media strategically and is a proponent for teaching students about digital identity development.

With a background in student affairs, academic advising, wellness, technology, and communications, Eric focuses his energies on educating clients and captivating audiences. As the Student Affairs and Technology blogger for Inside Higher Ed, he generates conversations, answers questions, and provides insight about a variety of "tech topics."  He has given presentations on social media and technology at multiple Student Affairs events (AACRAO, ACPA, ACUI, ACUHO-I, NACADA, NACAS, NACCU, NACS, and NASPA) and is a former regional chair of the NASPA Technology Knowledge Community.

Living in London and working globally, he knows too many acronyms, drinks a lot of coffee, enjoys running, and spends a lot of time writing, speaking, and thinking about social media, education, and technology.

Eric is a former Academic Advisor & Web Coordinator for the College of Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. He served previously as a Marketing Specialist for Student Affairs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received an AA from Indian Hills Community College, a BA in Communications from the University of Northern Iowa, and an Ed.M. in College Student Services Administration from Oregon State University. Eric can be found online at http://ericstoller.com/ and tweeting at http://twitter.com/ericstoller/.

All opinions expressed in this blog are solely his own, and do not reflect the opinions of his clients or any organizations of which he is a member. Please contact Eric with any questions or comments.

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Most Recent Articles

April 11, 2013
There were less than 60 kids in my graduating class in high school. At Columbus Community High School in Columbus Junction, Iowa - involvement in everything - was the norm. Athletes acted in plays. Musicians took photos for the yearbook. Everyone did everything. We didn't specialize. During my senior year of high school, I participated in marching band, concert band, jazz band, pep band, business club, science & math club, yearbook staff, newspaper staff, theater, and small/large group competitive speech.
April 3, 2013
When I agreed to speak about the "Future of Student Affairs" at Higher Ed Open Mic, I knew that I wanted to talk about three distinct topics: student affairs graduate programs, online-only students, and digital identity development. Those three areas are constantly pinging around my head. Attending multiple student affairs conferences and voraciously reading everything and anything that is related to higher education gives me ample cerebral material to digest and ponder.
March 21, 2013
This year's ACPA Annual Convention was in Las Vegas. Let's not do that ever again. Smoke-filled casino floors were like unhealthy moats that had to be crossed in order to get to sessions. Fortunately, as with every ACPA Annual Convention, opportunities for learning and connecting with fellow student affairs abounded. A unique aspect of this year's convention was the addition of a partnership with the NIRSA Annual Conference. Sharing the opening extravaganza and exhibit hall space was a nice touch.
March 14, 2013
It generally starts with a statement and then ends with a question. The statement is usually framed as: "Social media is/are a 24/7 concern." The question that follows said statement has consistently been: "What do we do about that?" There's a fascinating fear of social media that is ingrained in a lot of student affairs practitioners.
March 5, 2013
Student affairs professional association conference session topics are generally a direct reflection of practitioners in the field. Sessions at conferences span a wide array of functional areas, emerging trends, and competency-based tracks. However, there seems to be a trend at these events of favoring a certain demographic of student when it comes to session conversations. The default "student" is almost always an on-campus learner. Online learners are rarely included in session discussions.
February 12, 2013
Does your student affairs / higher education graduate program have a technology class? Have you ever hoped for a student affairs technology book? Maybe it's time to look at something outside of our usual wheelhouse. What am I talking about? Well, last October, I tweeted out a question about whether or not we should look at creating a Student Affairs Technology MOOC.
January 28, 2013
On January 16th at 9:06 AM, I liked the University of Phoenix Facebook Page. Because of my consulting practice, it makes sense for me to like a wide variety of higher-education-related pages on Facebook. Universities and colleges that I have worked with are in my list of likes as well as several other well-known schools and programs. I like seeing what they're up to on Facebook. When I liked Phoenix, I was doing it as a way to keep up on how they run their Facebook presence. Little did I realize at the time that my innocent "like" was going to be put to a use that I didn't expect.
January 27, 2013
In the past, when the University of Michigan (U-M) hosted a reception in Shanghai for admitted students and their families, about 80 people attended. Last year, the university used its profile on the popular Chinese microblogging site, Sina Weibo, to promote the event and 200 people showed up. With 400 million users, Weibo is similar to Twitter.
January 23, 2013
Ellucian has announced a new initiative called the "Ellucian Inspire Awards." With the goal of recognizing their customers who have made "measurable improvements" at their institutions using Ellucian's solutions or services, the new award offers a $3,000 prize. The new awards program focuses on projects that "achieved measurable results during the past two years in any of three categories:"
January 21, 2013
Three years ago when I uploaded a slide deck to SlideShare, it was the go-to site for presentation sharing. In the years following that initial upload, I've shared a handful of my slides. Unfortunately, the SlideShare interface has suffered from feature creep. The interface has gone from being simple and user-friendly to feeling clunky. Sharing slides with SlideShare just wasn't worth my time. I had to find an alternative…and then I stumbled upon Speaker Deck.

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