Eric Stoller

Eric Stoller is a higher education thought-leader, consultant, writer, and speaker. He frequently gives keynotes on how administrators can use social media strategically and is a proponent for teaching students about digital identity development.

With a background in student affairs, academic advising, wellness, technology, and communications, Eric focuses his energies on educating clients and captivating audiences. As the Student Affairs and Technology blogger for Inside Higher Ed, he generates conversations, answers questions, and provides insight about a variety of "tech topics."  He has given presentations on social media and technology at multiple Student Affairs events (AACRAO, ACPA, ACUI, ACUHO-I, NACADA, NACAS, NACCU, NACS, and NASPA) and is a former regional chair of the NASPA Technology Knowledge Community.

Living in London and working globally, he knows too many acronyms, drinks a lot of coffee, enjoys running, and spends a lot of time writing, speaking, and thinking about social media, education, and technology.

Eric is a former Academic Advisor & Web Coordinator for the College of Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. He served previously as a Marketing Specialist for Student Affairs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received an AA from Indian Hills Community College, a BA in Communications from the University of Northern Iowa, and an Ed.M. in College Student Services Administration from Oregon State University. Eric can be found online at http://ericstoller.com/ and tweeting at http://twitter.com/ericstoller/.

All opinions expressed in this blog are solely his own, and do not reflect the opinions of his clients or any organizations of which he is a member. Please contact Eric with any questions or comments.

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Most Recent Articles

September 19, 2012
My mom majored in English…. I did not. Articulating jumbled packages of thoughts into a coherent story ... sometimes I struggle with that. When I stroll through myriad posts within the student affairs blogosphere, I am consistently impressed with the level of thoughtfulness, vulnerability, forward-thinking, and love. Love for the profession, care for colleagues both near and far… it’s energizing to read so many wonderful posts. There are so many great writers within the student affairs profession.
September 12, 2012
Math, writing, science, history and a variety of additional topics are generally included in the core curricula for higher education institutions. They are the building blocks of education. Standards that have evolved over time. We tend to acknowledge their importance. Ideally, students will achieve a baseline of knowledge and skills that form the foundations of their educational experience.
September 4, 2012
People are always asking me about which schools/department do social media "the best" in higher education. My usual response is that the professionals who are actively engaging via social media are spending less time talking about what they are doing and more time focusing on the needs of their campus. However, when it comes to social media and campus dining, there's one operation that is consistently using social media at a level that I can easily say is "the best."
September 3, 2012
Prior to last year, I had never heard of KCTCS. Thankfully, I didn't have to resort to using my higher education acronym decoder ring. In September, a representative from the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) contacted me about an intriguing academic advising project. Having been referred by NACADA,
August 22, 2012
Content management systems (CMS) allow administrators to update webpages without having to be extremely fluent with HTML, CSS, or JS. WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) editors, while not always perfect, offer up a familiar interface that looks very much like a standard word processor. All sorts of information can be created, uploaded, edited, and modified via a CMS.
August 21, 2012
The conversations and presentations at this year's Boise Confab were cerebrally exhilarating. One particular session really piqued my interest. Jeremiah Shinn, Director for the Student Involvement & Leadership Center at Boise State University, gave an extremely honest presentation about how we conduct hirings in student affairs. Whether you agree with Shinn, disagree, and/or take umbrage, I bet you have an opinion. Here's a quick Q and A where he discusses his thoughts about "bad hires" and "good people":
August 16, 2012
They are everywhere. On Twitter profiles, blog bios, and Facebook pages across the social media sphere, inflated social media titles are rampant. People claiming to be experts with social media as they bask in the warm glow of 7 Twitter followers. Seriously, they are found in countless numbers on the web. Some people are even promoting themselves as Pinterest experts. That's almost as funny as the consultants who are sure that Google Plus is going to be "the next big thing." It's an epidemic of throwing stars, mountain climbing gear, and lightsabers.
August 15, 2012
Let's begin with a hypothetical scenario*: When an individual Twitter account increases from having 3,000 followers to more than 20,000, one might think that that particular account was benefiting from some sort of notoriety. However, in this hypothetical situation, let's say that said Twitter account "magically" grows its following daily like clockwork.
August 9, 2012
When Cara Rousseau, social media manager for Duke University, emailed me about the new Duke University Admissions website, I was immediately intrigued. With a stated goal of wanting to "create a true-to-life Duke experience within the digital space" that focused on the "student voice and student-to-student interactions, the new site is mobile-ready and built upon quality storytelling.
August 5, 2012
Social media increases student engagement. How do I know this? Well, let's try an analogy. Let's say that you are a carpenter in the early 1900s. You have a certain toolkit that you use to go about your work. You build houses with said toolkit. Now, let's hop in a DeLorean to 2012. Carpentry is a totally different gig. The tools have changed…a lot. Big box stores provide ample selections of tools and all sorts of gadgets. Carpentry has evolved, in part, because the tools have made increases in efficiencies possible. In the sense that Student Affairs practitioners are like carpenters - instead of building houses - we build community, increase student engagement, and foster opportunities for student development.

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