Eric Stoller

Eric Stoller is a higher education thought-leader, consultant, writer, and speaker. He frequently gives keynotes on how administrators can use social media strategically and is a proponent for teaching students about digital identity development.

With a background in student affairs, academic advising, wellness, technology, and communications, Eric focuses his energies on educating clients and captivating audiences. As the Student Affairs and Technology blogger for Inside Higher Ed, he generates conversations, answers questions, and provides insight about a variety of "tech topics."  He has given presentations on social media and technology at multiple Student Affairs events (AACRAO, ACPA, ACUI, ACUHO-I, NACADA, NACAS, NACCU, NACS, and NASPA) and is a former regional chair of the NASPA Technology Knowledge Community.

Living in London and working globally, he knows too many acronyms, drinks a lot of coffee, enjoys running, and spends a lot of time writing, speaking, and thinking about social media, education, and technology.

Eric is a former Academic Advisor & Web Coordinator for the College of Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. He served previously as a Marketing Specialist for Student Affairs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received an AA from Indian Hills Community College, a BA in Communications from the University of Northern Iowa, and an Ed.M. in College Student Services Administration from Oregon State University. Eric can be found online at http://ericstoller.com/ and tweeting at http://twitter.com/ericstoller/.

All opinions expressed in this blog are solely his own, and do not reflect the opinions of his clients or any organizations of which he is a member. Please contact Eric with any questions or comments.

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Most Recent Articles

January 3, 2012
In starting this new year, I've decided to hijack my blog and create a series of posts about the Student Affairs job search. While the job search for Student Affairs professionals does require a certain amount of technology, these posts will focus more on the process of searching.
December 22, 2011
A year-end post ... with shoutouts to many colleagues.
December 21, 2011
RSS (Really Simple Syndication) has been part of my daily brain sustenance for more than 5 years. Most sites that produce content on a regular basis provide RSS feeds for their readers.
December 20, 2011
Efficiency is important. Being more efficient usually means that you have more time. Having more time generally allows additional space for innovation, planning, conversing, thinking, creativity, etc. Technology can be instrumental in making us more efficient. For Student Affairs professionals, efficiency is something that we can usually increase.
December 15, 2011
An "unconventional" Student Affairs Unconference is a fairly provocative way of framing an event.
December 14, 2011
While giving the closing keynote for the NASPA Western Regional Conference last month, I mentioned that one of the frequently used reasons for why some people do not use Twitter is because so many people use the platform to talk about the weather. This particular NASPA event was in San Diego. In November, in sunny San Diego, the weather was joyfully discussed by several conference attendees. We talk about the weather during our face-to-face conversations with one another all of the time.
December 1, 2011
If you create video content and use YouTube as your communications platform, then you have to check out the YouTube Creator Playbook. Billed as a compilation of important tips, best practices, and strategies, the Creator Playbook is a must-read for all levels of YouTube users. It literally is 70 pages of awesome. Seriously, if you want to get better at using YouTube, read the Creator Playbook.
November 30, 2011
Brene Brown's talk on vulnerability resonates with me for a variety of reasons. My blog posts at my personal site generally have a bit of vulnerability in them. Being vulnerable in professional spaces is something that I have explored in-person and in online conversations. However, vulnerability is difficult to maintain when you are on a deadline or you just don't feel like sharing a bit of yourself in a blog post. In the spirit of being more vulnerable, here is me sharing a little more...
November 22, 2011
Sometimes I wonder how we even have telephones or email accounts. These tools when misused can lead to severe FERPA violations. However, at some point, our professional common sense prevailed and we realized that banning communication tools isn't a FERPA requirement.
November 17, 2011
Graduate assistantships often dictate the pathways for a student affairs professional. Our experience during our masters program can have long-lasting impacts on our functional area choice post-grad school. Oftentimes, our assistantship department is able to send us to at least one professional association conference. Usually, we choose the association and its conference based on the job that we’re doing in exchange for a tuition remission / stipend. However, how many people in their student affairs graduate program learn about what I like to call “the student affairs association acronym soup”?

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