Eric Stoller

Eric Stoller is a higher education thought-leader, consultant, writer, and speaker. He frequently gives keynotes on how administrators can use social media strategically and is a proponent for teaching students about digital identity development.

With a background in student affairs, academic advising, wellness, technology, and communications, Eric focuses his energies on educating clients and captivating audiences. As the Student Affairs and Technology blogger for Inside Higher Ed, he generates conversations, answers questions, and provides insight about a variety of "tech topics."  He has given presentations on social media and technology at multiple Student Affairs events (AACRAO, ACPA, ACUI, ACUHO-I, NACADA, NACAS, NACCU, NACS, and NASPA) and is a former regional chair of the NASPA Technology Knowledge Community.

Eric is a former Academic Advisor & Web Coordinator for the College of Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. He served previously as a Marketing Specialist for Student Affairs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received an AA from Indian Hills Community College, a BA in Communications from the University of Northern Iowa, and an Ed.M. in College Student Services Administration from Oregon State University. Eric can be found online at http://ericstoller.com/ and tweeting at http://twitter.com/ericstoller/.

All opinions expressed in this blog are solely his own, and do not reflect the opinions of his clients or any organizations of which he is a member. Please contact Eric with any questions or comments.

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Most Recent Articles

October 14, 2010
It is now day 3 at EDUCAUSE 2010. I've been to countless meetings, sat in on a few sessions, and had a great time touring the exhibit hall. The amount of high level strategic thinking that's taking place has been phenomenal. The future of higher education technology is being shaped as I write this post.
October 13, 2010
The folks running the EDUCAUSE 2010 Annual Conference (#EDUCAUSE10 if you're on Twitter) have done an amazing job of providing online functionality for attendees. I have been thoroughly impressed. Customizable schedules, a really nifty mobile website, scannable ID cards, and unique hashtags for sessions are just a few of the many ways that this conference has leveraged technology.
October 6, 2010
One of my favorite personal learning networks (PLN) is the #SAchat. Student Affairs practitioners gather every week to chat via Twitter about a topic that is relevant to the field.
October 4, 2010
This post is dedicated to my mom and every woman who has had to fight to be recognized as an expert with technology.
September 29, 2010
Thus far, blogging for Inside Higher Ed has been an amazing experience. After 23 posts, I wanted to check-in with folks and give a bit more insight into my blogging process.
September 28, 2010
I have 3 days left at Oregon State University (OSU). I've been an academic advisor for more than 3 years and have accumulated a tremendous amount of knowledge about OSU's academic processes. Life as an academic advisor consists of a never-ending stream of academic regulations, registration functions, course planning, substitutions, petitions, overrides, mentoring, teaching, and questions. When I started at OSU in 2007, I knew very little about what it meant to be an academic advisor.
September 23, 2010
I usually have several different post ideas floating around in my brain at any given time. I try to select a topic that I think will generate a post that interests both me and my readers. I had planned on writing about something other than course catalogs again (I mean, it's not like they are that glamorous) and I apologize for writing about them so soon. However, there was one comment that got my attention. Greg, who I would assume has never read anything that I've ever written before, left a comment that I feel needs to be addressed.
September 23, 2010
Most web-based course catalogs that I have surfed through seem like they were designed using an original Commodore 64. As an academic advisor, I often have the "pleasure" of browsing course catalogs from schools all over the United States. I have yet to find a course catalog that has an intuitive interface. My experience as an advisor should theoretically provide me with some advantage when I'm perusing a school's course catalog as I search for course information. However, I can say without any hesitation that most online course catalogs need to be rebuilt and redesigned.
September 17, 2010

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