Itir Toksöz

Itır is originally from Edremit, a large town on the Aegean Coast in Turkey. After leaving her hometown for her studies, she has lived in both cities of the world which have land both in Asia and Europe: Çanakkale and Istanbul. She has earned a BA degree in Political Science and Public Administration from Marmara University in Turkey in 1998, a DEA degree in Strategy in International Relations from Université Paris I Pantheon-Sorbonne in 1999 and a Ph.D degree in Public and International Affairs from Northeastern University, Boston in 2007. She has taught several courses in International Relations in the USA and Turkey. She is now an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Dogus University in Istanbul and the Vice Dean of the Faculty of Economic and Administrative Sciences at the same University. She is also the Erasmus Exchange Program Departmental Coordinator for the Department of International Relations. Her main areas of research is civil-military relations, threat perceptions, science and technology in international relations and human security. As well as these traditional security issues, she also studies international relations through films, cartoons, music and other arts. She is a member of the T:AP (Transcend: Art and Peace) network. Itir also loves composing her own songs and writing her own lyrics, poetry, tales and essays. She adores traveling, the seaside, the cosmopolitan cities, the juncture of civilizations and her ultimate goal in life is sharing life itself through a “meeting of the minds.”

Itır TOKSÖZ Uluslararası İlişkiler alanında doktora sahibidir ve ABD ve Türkiye’deüniversitelerde dersler vermiştir. Şu anda kendisi Istanbul-Türkiye’de Uluslararasıİlişkiler alanında Yardımcı Doç. Dr. olarak çalışmaktadır.

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Most Recent Articles

March 27, 2012
I am writing this blog piece on March 8th, Women’s Day.  I started the day by a very meaningful message which was sent by the President of my University. In her message, Prof. Dr. Elif Çepni of Doğuş University stated how proud she was to be at a University where the majority of high administrative positions were held by women: The President of the University is a woman, there are 5 faculties and 4 of them are led by Deans that are women. There are also 4 women Vice Deans in the University, since in 4 of the 5 Faculties, one of the 2 Vice Deans is also a woman. Moreover, the Dean of Students is also a woman. The head of the Foreign Languages School, the Secretary General, the Director of Student Affairs, the Director of the IT department and the Director of Purchasing department are also all women. There is a considerable number of Department Chairs or Academic Unit Heads who are female as well. In my faculty, which is the Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, 62% of all faculty members are women.
February 7, 2012
Last November, I briefly visited Boston to give a lecture at Northeastern University, my alma mater where I got my Ph.D. degree. The last time I was there was four and a half years ago to defend my dissertation. It felt like “Homecoming” for me this time, when I visited my old university after such a long time.
November 17, 2011
Many of you may think that this post is going to be about the different stages of professional maturity as academics progress in their careers, but no, this is not what I intend to write. My point will be the about the personal maturity of academics and the way it affects how they handle both their social and professional lives.
August 18, 2011
Last month, I was invited to a conference in Kuwait to deliver a speech. I was given very little notice. After a speedy preparation of 3-4 days I made it to the Atatürk International Airport in Istanbul. As I handed my passport to the police officer at passport control, the officer looked at my passport, smiled at me and said, “I was the one who processed your passport the last time you went abroad.” It was only about a month ago that I had been in Poland within the context of the Erasmus Programme.
July 10, 2011
It is the beginning of the summer period again when I am no longer teaching and when I take some time to assess how the year went. After my experiences in the classroom this year, I am convinced more than ever that teaching with the traditional methods of lecturing does not work anymore on the students of the new generation. I am afraid that the failure to realize this is likely to create a gap between professors and the students, and thus stand as an obstacle to success in our classrooms.
June 9, 2011
When I was a high school student, my friends and family and I, had a favorite topic of discussion: What kind of a city is ideal for a university student life?
May 25, 2011
I’d like to warn our dear readers: This piece is likely to be a somewhat dark one.
April 19, 2011
The day I am writing this, I am sick. I was supposed to go to the Polish Consulate to do a visa application this morning, as I will be teaching at one of our partner Universities for a week there next month within the Erasmus Exchange Program. I woke up with a runny nose, sore throat, aching muscles and fever. Actually there were the signs that I was catching a cold or a virus or something by Saturday but I thought I would get over that quickly. I did not. So I could not go to the consulate to do my application and I called work and told them that I would not be able to come to work today.
March 22, 2011
Today writing about ethics in academics became a necessity, after all that has been happening in Japan for the past week.
February 17, 2011


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