Jake New

Jake New, Reporter, covers student life and athletics for Inside Higher Ed. He joined the publication in June 2014 after writing for the Chronicle of Higher Education and covering education technology for eCampus News. For his work at the Chronicle covering legal disputes between academic publishers and critical librarians, he was awarded the David W. Miller Award for Young Journalists. His work has also appeared in the Bloomington Herald-Times, Indianapolis Monthly, Slate, PBS, Times Higher Education and the Australian. Jake studied journalism at Indiana University, where he was editor-in-chief of the Indiana Daily Student.

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Most Recent Articles

October 9, 2015
The family of a black Harvard graduate who committed suicide creates an organization in his honor that seeks to "improve the support for the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color."
October 8, 2015
The Drake Group, an organization pushing for more emphasis on academics in college sportsshould this be "in the intercollegiate athletic system" (since this isn't about games)? -sj, urged the National Collegiate Athletic Association on Wednesday to discontinue using the metrics it uses to determine academic eligibility.
October 8, 2015
Indiana University suspended its chapter of Alpha Tau Omega after a video surfaced that allegedly showed the fraternity chapter at IU forcing pledges to perform oral sex on women. The explicit video was posted online and shared on social media Wednesday. It shows a group of men cheering on a young man -- clad only in boxer shorts -- as he engages in oral sex with a fully nude woman on a mattress. Other men, also wearing only underwear, sit on the floor nearby as the man on the mattress appears to struggle to push away from the woman.
October 7, 2015
Are the physical and emotional beatings that come with historically black colleges and universities competing against big-time football powers worth the financial incentive?
October 1, 2015
A federal appeals court backs ruling that NCAA violates antitrust laws with limits on athlete compensation, but rejects allowing athletes to receive up to $5,000 a year in pay.
September 30, 2015
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday upheld a lower court's decision that National Collegiate Athletic Association rules that limit what college athletes can be paid violate antitrust laws. But the appeals court tossed out the original judge's recommendation that athletes receive deferred compensation of up to $5,000 per year.
September 30, 2015
New penalties over academic fraud are only the most recent in Southern Methodist's history of breaking NCAA rules. Among the guilty: the university's renowned basketball coach, and a former official responsible for compliance with the rules.
September 29, 2015
Three former University of Minnesota at Duluth coaches are suing the Minnesota Board of Regents alleging gender, sexual orientation, national origin and age discrimination by university administrators. All three women are openly gay, including Shannon Miller, the successful women's hockey coach whose contract was not renewed last year amid much controversy after university officials said they could no longer afford to pay her salary.
September 29, 2015
New data from Gallup-Purdue survey find only half of alumni "strongly agree" that college is worth what they spent. Students with experiential learning opportunities and supportive professors were more likely to agree.
September 28, 2015
Arizona State University has apologized and offered to cover the medical expenses of local councilman after the university's mascot, Sparky, injured the man by jumping on his back. The councilman, David Schapira, was still recovering from back surgery during last week's football game when Sparky playfully jumped on Schapira's back, resulting in a torn muscle.


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