Joshua Kim

Dr. Joshua Kim is the Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL).  He has a PhD in demography and sociology from Brown University.  Josh can be reached by e-mail at joshua.m.kim@dartmouth.edu and by Twitter at @joshmkim.  Josh's CV can be found at joshmkim.com.

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Most Recent Articles

May 4, 2010
Three predictions about how changes in the curricular mediums will alter the learning process. Prediction 1: Curricular content will be consumed in shorter chunks, across more diffuse times, and in multiple places. Prediction 2: The amount of time any given individual (student) spends consuming curricular content will decrease. Prediction 3: The total amount of curricular content consumed will increase, as prior "non-students" and "student non-consumers" evolve into curricular consumers.
May 3, 2010
I don't want to push my opinion too much about Cathy Davidson's grading experiments at Duke. Not that I don't have opinions, it's just that I don't have any better answers than everyone who commented on the article - as grading is a puzzle that we all struggle with. What I'd like to add are 3 ways that technology and learning technologists can assist faculty who would like to experiment as Professor Davidson has done with finding more authentic and effective ways to use grading to promote learning.
May 2, 2010
So Nobel laureate Michael Beard assures us all of the the inevitability and consequences of global warming, in Ian McEwan's smart and hilarious new book Solar.
April 29, 2010
Check out Steve Jobs' open letter on why Apple does not allow Flash on its mobile devices. Jobs gives a number of reasons why Flash is not supported, including: a lack of open standards, a diminished demand as the newer (and supported) H.264 format is rapidly growing, reliability/security/performance issues, battery life, and limited support for the touch interface. Why is the Apple / Adobe kerfuffle worth our attention? 3 Reasons:
April 28, 2010
The thing that sticks with me from my Ph.D. program was being told that the difference between an undergraduate and a graduate student is that grad students produce new knowledge, while undergrads consume. Or maybe it was that professors produce new knowledge, and grad students should move from consumers to producers. Whatever. It made so much sense at the time. Now I realize how wrong this advice is. Nowadays, with the diffusion of social media, blogging, and Web 2.0 tools - everyone can (and should) be producers.
April 27, 2010
I'm dying to book club This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All, maybe we can start the conversation virtually. Some Takeaways:
April 26, 2010
--Kindles Are Everywhere: People seem to love to read on these things on the beach and at the pool. Mostly guys in the 45 to 64 demographic. --The iPad is Perfect for Vacations: At various times the iPad served to: a) entertain kids with movies and games on long car rides, b) as an easy way to delete e-mail (to lessen e-mail pileup), without the motivation to respond, and c) to download and play Banagrams.
April 14, 2010
In 2025, when book publishers look back to try to understand why their business became first disintermediated and then displaced, the prevailing sentiment will be one of regret. They will ask themselves: "How did we fail to learn from the example of the music industry and newspaper business? Why didn't we take advantage of new technologies instead of fighting them? How did we manage to fail to create a new generation of book readers and book buyers?"
April 13, 2010
Hope you will consider joining me and reading This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All, by Marilyn Johnson. I'm about 50 pages into this love letter to librarians and their profession, and look forward to discussing what Johnson has to say with my academic librarian, faculty and computing colleagues.
April 12, 2010
A Dartmouth senior, Lucretia Witte, conducted a research project "collecting information and testimonies on how students view the roles of technology, for good and for ill, in their learning experiences". Below are some questions (from me) and answers (from Lucretia) about her research project. I hope that you find these thoughts about her research process and findings as valuable as I do. Question: Please describe your research project. What were your main research questions? What methods did you use to conduct your research?

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