Joshua Kim

Dr. Joshua Kim is the Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL).  He has a PhD in demography and sociology from Brown University.  Josh can be reached by e-mail at joshua.m.kim@dartmouth.edu and by Twitter at @joshmkim.  Josh's CV can be found at joshmkim.com.

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Most Recent Articles

September 15, 2011
Higher ed is tough on our vendors. We are a vocal bunch, we like to share our opinions, and with the proliferation of blogs, tweets, and listservs we have the ability to publicly express our strong opinions. The free exchange of ideas and opinions in our web communication platforms is a good thing, but the ability to quickly disseminate our opinions must be balanced against the requirements to be collegial, professional, and balanced.
September 14, 2011
Apple drives me crazy. What I Believe - And Why Apple Makes Me Wrong:
September 13, 2011
I've been mulling over the Google $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola Mobile. The consensus on the rationale for the purchase seems to be: Patents: The deal is really about Motorola's 17,000 patents, and the need for Google to have patents to fight off mobile operating system lawsuits by Apple, Microsoft, Nokia and who knows who else.
September 12, 2011
"Amazon has told publishers it is considering creating a digital-book library featuring older titles, people familiar with the talks said. The content would be available to customers of Amazon Prime, who currently pay the retailer $79 a year for unlimited two-day shipping and for access to a digital library of movies and TV shows." From the WSJ - 9/11/11
September 11, 2011
Thank you Tony Sanfilippo , Assistant Press Director at Penn State Press, for laying out the challenges faced by university presses so clearly in his post "Price and printruns" on 9/8/11. Can we brainstorm some solutions to the high price of University Press books together?
September 8, 2011
Is the promise of a shift from physical to digital content stalled? By academic year 2011-2012 I expected to discover, receive, and consume most content digitally. And while I always thought that our academic curricular content would lag somewhat behind the move to digital in our consumer/entertainment content, I did not expect things to be so static. Evidence For A Stall:
September 7, 2011
Randy Martin's new book, Under New Management: Universities, Administrative Labor, and the Professional Turn looks like an important contribution to the debate about the changing nature of higher ed.
September 6, 2011
Last week I participated in a type of web meeting that I hope becomes the norm for academic / vendor coloration. The discussion was a "client-led Blackboard Mobile Learn Enhancement Requests," with participation from both the folks who run the Blackboard mobile division and clients (and prospective clients) worldwide. A discussion between academic clients (existing or potential) and a vendor is nothing unusual. Nor is it noteworthy to hold this discussion using web meeting tools. What I think was innovative, and worth repeating, was that this discussion was:
September 5, 2011
3 reasons to read Cathy Davidson's Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn:
September 1, 2011
My Kindle is cannibalizing my media consumption. Not so much the Kindle device, which I look forward to Amazon making big improvements upon. It is more the Kindle ecosystem, specifically the ability to instantly purchase any newly published book for the cost of a softcover. This week I purchased Tom Perrotta's The Leftovers the day it came out ($12.99). No waiting the interminable 2 days for Amazon to ship the book.

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