Joshua Kim

Dr. Joshua Kim is the Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL).  He has a PhD in demography and sociology from Brown University.  Josh can be reached by e-mail at joshua.m.kim@dartmouth.edu and by Twitter at @joshmkim.  Josh's CV can be found at joshmkim.com.

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Most Recent Articles

December 7, 2011
Committee work may be time intensive. And committee work might not be as relevant as we'd like for promotion. But committee work is not hard work.
December 6, 2011
This past weekend I went bowling, and I lost.  3 games to nil.  My opponent - a 13 year old middle-schooler. 
December 5, 2011
I have this hypothesis that edtech companies are overly worried about sharing their future product roadmaps, and that they would in fact benefit from being more transparent and inclusive in the development and sharing of future plans.
December 4, 2011
While Niall Ferguson's new book, Civilization: The West and the Rest, is mostly about the past, it true importance is what it says about our future. Nowadays it is hard not too worry about the future, as we struggle from one funding crisis to the next, watching resources for public investments (like education) erode.
December 1, 2011
My campus is in the middle of a strategic planning process, and I have the good fortune of participating in the "digital" working group.
November 30, 2011
Audrey Watters' post inspired me to spend some time building a new Coursekit site.
November 29, 2011
2011 was the year that I tried some Apple and Microsoft mashups. They failed.
November 28, 2011
I'm intrigued by this whole idea of borrowing Kindle books from my public library.
November 27, 2011
If I were with you now, I'd ask you what you are reading. Why did you choose your current book? Paper, e-book, or audio? Library, bookstore or online? How have your book reading habits changed? What do you plan to read next?  
November 22, 2011
Two book recommendations for Thanksgiving 2011 are Robert Frank's The High-Beta Rich and Michael Lewis' Boomerang. These books go nicely as a pair, as the first seeks to explain the consequences of the financialization of wealth and the second follows this trend to its ultimate conclusion (world economic crisis and default). If you were planning on going crazy on Black Friday at Best Buy with your credit card, you might be wiser to download (buy?) these books and stay home reading.

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