Margaret Andrews

Margaret Andrews is a seasoned academic leader with over twenty years of experience in higher education, business and consulting. She has held a variety of positions in higher education, including Associate Dean at Harvard University's Division of Continuing Education,Executive Director of the MBA Program, Alumni Relations and Marketing at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and Vice Provost at the Hult International Business School. She teaches courses and professional and executive programs in strategy, management, leadership and creativity at Harvard University's Division of Continuing Education, has worked and taught in the United States, Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and is the founder of Mind and Hand Associates, a boutique consulting firm providing research and consulting services to clients in the higher education sector.  She earned her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and her graduate degree at MIT.  You can reach Margaret via email at margaret@mind-and-hand.com or Twitter @AndrewsMargaret.  You can see more on Margaret's background on her LinkedIn profile.  

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

July 27, 2017
It’s not often that a WSJ story makes me laugh out loud, but this one did – twice! 
July 6, 2017
Knock, knock. Who’s there?  
June 7, 2017
Lessons learned from whitewater rafting that are applicable to higher ed institutions (and other organizations)
May 17, 2017
Sometimes the best lessons come from challenging circumstances. 
April 25, 2017
Figuring out how to do more with less or imagining the future of higher education (and your role in it)?
February 21, 2017
The worldwide market for higher education is large – and shifting.
January 4, 2017
Why do we all work in higher education?
June 29, 2016
In teaching ethics, what works and what’s just wishful thinking?
May 30, 2016
How do we define leadership, other than that we know it when we see it? 
May 24, 2016
Are we prepared – or are colleges and universities preparing students – for the new world of work? 

Pages

Back to Top