Mary Churchill

Mary Churchill is the Executive Director and Founding Editor of University of Venus. In addition to writing at University of Venus and She’s Got It! at Inside Higher Ed, she created Old School, New School at The Chronicle and is regularly invited to write and present on the future of education.

Mary is passionate about the role of public engagement in higher education. In her twenty-five years of management experience, she has tirelessly advocated for a new paradigm of leadership informed by diversity, collaboration, and equity. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology in 2004 and has taught courses in International Studies, Sociology, and Political Science.

Mary is currently Associate Provost and Dean at Salem State University where she leads the graduate school, the school of continuing and professional studies, and acts as senior international officer.  She is also on the board of the Massachusetts Network of Women Leaders in Higher Education which is affiliated wih the American Council on Education's Inclusive Excellence Group and involved with ACE's Moving the Needle initiative focused on advancing women leaders in higher education. 

Married to an amazingly talented librarian with whom she is raising an ten-year old son, she is also active in her Roxbury neighborhood in Boston and on several community-based committees and boards. Originally from the “pets or meat” world portrayed in Michael Moore’s Flint, Michigan; she was the first in her family to attend college.

Mary can be reached by e-mail at marylchurchill@gmail.com and can also be found on Twitter (@mary_churchill) and LinkedIn.

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Most Recent Articles

June 6, 2011
What makes for a successful collaboration with a corporate partner? Although academic institutions are historically risk-averse, more and more universities are searching for ways to officially partner with private corporations both locally and globally. Last week’s sessions at the NAFSA11 conference for international education were filled with references to the growth of these partnerships.
June 3, 2011
Earlier this week, I had the pleasure of attending Vice-Chancellor Nigel Thrift’s presentation: Taking Global Research Cooperation to a New Level. Thrift’s talk was provocative and engaging. Rather than try to summarize it here, I’ll share some of the pieces that are more relevant for University of Venus readers:
June 1, 2011
Internationalization is about changing culture. The best higher ed internationalization strategy in the world is doomed to fail if it doesn’t include a comprehensive plan for changing the culture of your institution. Rather than ignore prejudice and outdated attitudes towards other countries, international students, and global scholars; institutions have to build cultural change into their strategy. Too often, an institution’s internationalization strategy is developed at the most senior executive levels and implemented haphazardly and irregularly on campus.
June 1, 2011
I’ll be blogging from #NAFSA11 in Vancouver, Canada for the next couple of days. This year’s Annual NAFSA Conference brings together over 8,000 international educators from countries around the world.
May 11, 2011
“US and Australia Usher in New Agent Guidelines” –This article came flying through my Twitter feed this week and I was happy to see that progress is being made towards institutionalizing the training and vetting of agents who recruit international students to study at higher ed institutions. This is particularly important as countries such as the US ramp up their recruitment of international students in hopes of diversifying their student body and revenue base.
April 20, 2011
Neoliberalism, Managerialism, Commodification, CorporatizationThese seem to be the buzz-words in current critiques of higher education, education, and society in general. In the past couple of weeks, two articles on these topics struck both a personal and professional chord for me. One was an article by the Insecure Scholar in the Times Higher Education (UK) the other was an article in The Journal of Education Policy by Louise Archer (see details below). Both authors focused on how larger changes in higher education and society have real impacts on our daily lives.
February 9, 2011
From the archives - this post was originally published at http://uvenus.org on 2010.04.06.I have always been attracted to everyday forms of resistance over BIG SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (see James Scott – Weapons of the Weak and Michel de Certeau – The Practice of Everyday Life). In real life, these two types of resistance are usually found together either working side-by-side or working collaboratively with one another to make change happen.
January 12, 2011
This is the first in a series of posts from our archives. We will be sharing posts that we published prior to partnering with Inside Higher Ed in July 2010. Why Do We Write? was originally published at http://uvenus.org on 4.12.2010.
September 26, 2010
Boston, Massachusetts, USA The dean’s office. The provost’s office. The president’s office.
September 6, 2010
Vacation is supposed to be a time away from one’s normal routine – an escape from the drudgery of day-to-day life. However, when you are trained to critique and engage in critical dialogue, it becomes virtually impossible to unplug and escape. This is the conundrum of an academic on vacation. We can’t stop thinking and we don't really want to.

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