Nate Kreuter

Nate Kreuter is an assistant professor of English at Western Carolina University, where he teaches rhetoric and writing. He is currently completing his first book manuscript, which is tentatively titled Rhetorical Intelligence: The CIA, Iraq, and the Uncertainties of Knowing. Nate's personal blog and additional professional information are available here. You can e-mail Nate directly here, or follow him on Twitter by following @lawnsports

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

April 9, 2012
It's time for programs to be honest about what their doctoral students need to support life's basic necessities, writes Nate Kreuter.
March 26, 2012
Spring is an unusual time of year in academic careers, writes Nate Kreuter. While nature is blooming, projects and degrees are being wrapped up.
March 12, 2012
New faculty members have to pick their battles with care, writes Nate Kreuter.
February 22, 2012
Nate Kreuter considers the role of instructors when their students come to them with decidedly nonacademic problems.
February 6, 2012
The way to keep electronic communication under control is to set expectations for professors and for students, writes Nate Kreuter.
January 25, 2012
Nate Kreuter reflects on what he learned playing an all-campus game in which he was the only faculty member.
January 13, 2012
Don't let the tight job market scare you from making sure your professional quirks can fit into departments to which you are applying, writes Nate Kreuter.
December 19, 2011
Nate Kreuter writes about his frustrations with academics who look down on the communities where they teach.
December 5, 2011
Whether at holiday parties or job interview dinners, this is the time of year that grad students and junior professors end up with liquor and senior professors in the same room. Nate Kreuter offers advice.
November 21, 2011
Nate Kreuter explains why so many grad students ignore warnings about the job market -- and why that makes it even more important for Ph.D. programs to talk about the realities.

Pages

Back to Top