Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

February 8, 2016
Two new studies suggest many colleges may be too quick to write off low-income students and community college transfers. Money and extra support change the equation, at least for some.
February 5, 2016
Roughly one in four of the 1.9 million high school students who graduated in 2015 and took the ACT are from low-income backgrounds, meaning their annual family incomes are less than $36,000. This group continues to lag in college readiness, according to the latest version of an annual report from the testing organization and the National Council for Community and Education Partnerships.
February 5, 2016
The U.S. Department of Education this week introduced several new requirements for accreditors, adding to the slightly beefed-up new rules it announced in November. The department has pushed more aggressive reforms to the accreditation process, including a request for the U.S. Congress to drop its ban on imposing specific standards on accreditors.
February 3, 2016
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation on Tuesday released a report on how some states and colleges are using data to improve student graduation and retention rates. The foundation said the report is based on a decade's worth of lessons learned.
February 1, 2016
The American Association of State Colleges and Universities this week announced a project to work with 44 of its member institutions to substantially change students' experience during their first year of college. The project is aimed at improving college completion rates, with a particular eye at helping low-income and first-generation college students, as well as members of minority groups. The public university group said the work would feature several proven methods of improving student retention and success.
January 29, 2016
A campaign for students to take 15 credits a semester is growing. But some worry 15-credit course loads could become a requirement for financial aid, or might prod job-holding students to take on too much.
January 28, 2016
Businesses should have a stronger voice in accreditation, while also developing their own alternative to the process, say the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation and USA Funds.
January 26, 2016
The GED Testing Service today announced that it will lower the passing score for the GED, a test that serves as the equivalent of a high-school degree. At the same time the service, which Pearson and the American Council on Education own jointly, said it was adding two new, optional levels above the passing score (and the previous passing level) that will allow students to signify college readiness or to earn ACE recommendations for college credits.
January 22, 2016
Five additional states will create statewide student success centers in an effort to help more community college students earn a credential. The announcement this week means the total number of states with such centers in place will grow to 12.
January 20, 2016
The Warrior-Scholar Program hosts academic boot camps for veterans of the U.S. military to help them make the transition to college. Teams of student veterans run the two-week sessions, which are taught by university professors and graduate students.

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November 21, 2014
Half of Corinthian Colleges goes nonprofit, as loan guarantor ECMC will buy 56 Everest and WyoTech campuses. Critics say the purchase doesn't do nearly enough for students or to prevent conflicts of interest.
September 25, 2014
The default rate on federal loans edges down as 21 colleges face sanctions for having rates that exceed the legal threshold.
August 19, 2014
The messy failure of Corinthian Colleges raises questions about limitations of the Education Department's oversight of for-profit chains, and how it might tighten as other companies teeter.
May 28, 2014
As public comment period ends for the administration's "gainful employment" proposal, for-profit colleges and supporters blast the rules as an overreach; critics of the industry say proposal doesn't go far enough.
May 7, 2014
Can a for-profit industry beset by growing legal and financial woes fend off the Obama administration's second try at gainful employment rules?
December 13, 2013
As federal panel weighs fate of agency that withdrew support from City College of San Francisco, lawmakers on Capitol Hill ponder future role for the government in accreditation.
October 10, 2013
Laureate Education has quietly become an 800,000-student behemoth and a major player in global higher education. So what is the company, exactly?
September 10, 2013
Gainful employment rewrite kicks off with rule-making session, but consensus appears unlikely as negotiators are far apart on day one.
August 26, 2013
President, in direct remarks on the sector, notes concerns that some institutions "make out like a bandit," but calls for more scrutiny of colleges across the board.
March 13, 2013
California lawmaker wants MOOCs and other online providers to help meet student demand, and will encourage -- and some fear force -- public colleges to accept those credits.

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