Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

May 26, 2020
The National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I Council has voted to allow student athletes in all sports to participate in voluntary athletics activities beginning June 1.
May 20, 2020
The architect and manager of Florida's COVID-19 data dashboard was removed from her post last week, and researchers at several universities in the state told Florida Today that they are concerned about the state limiting access to data about the pandemic.
May 14, 2020
Pine Manor College, a small private institution located in Chestnut Hill, Mass., has signed an agreement to merge with Boston College, according to a news release from BC. The integration will be an "educational partnership of mutual benefit," according to the release. "The agreement will establish the Pine Manor Institute for Student Success, endowed with $50 million from Boston College, which will fund outreach and academic support programs for underserved, low-income students," Boston College said.
May 14, 2020
Vice President Mike Pence held a call Wednesday with leaders of 14 colleges and universities. They were joined by Betsy DeVos, the U.S. secretary of education, and Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, in a discussion about "best practices to get students back to school in the fall," according to a news release from the vice president's office.
May 14, 2020
Senator Lamar Alexander, the Tennessee Republican who chairs the Senate's education committee, on Sunday questioned whether testing capacities for COVID-19 were adequate to reopen a large university campus in August. Alexander, a former U.S. Secretary of Education and president of the University of Tennessee, expanded on those thoughts during a Fox News interview Wednesday.
May 13, 2020
The California Collegiate Athletic Association, an NCAA Division II conference comprised of 12 California State University campuses and the University of California, San Diego, has suspended all sports competition for the fall of 2020, the association said.
May 12, 2020
Senator Lamar Alexander, the Tennessee Republican who chairs the Senate's education committee, on Sunday praised coronavirus testing in the U.S., citing Johns Hopkins University research that eight million tests have conducted, more per capita even than South Korea. But Alexander said current testing capacity remains inadequate for reopening large college and university campuses for in-person instruction.
May 8, 2020
The Board of Regents for the University System of Georgia has granted the system authority for a plan to possibly cut jobs or furlough employees. The system said it is working with its 26 colleges and universities to develop a new spending plan for the 2021 fiscal year that would feature a 14 percent reduction from the current fiscal year. Georgia's tax revenues dropped by roughly $1 billion in April.
May 8, 2020
Arizona State University will continue to produce publicly available COVID-19 modeling despite being told by the Arizona Department of Health Services to "pause" that work, The Arizona Republic reported.
May 7, 2020
New federal data show a substantial drop in renewals of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid by returning college students, according to an analysis from the National College Attainment Network.

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April 2, 2020
Higher education groups push the Education Department to suspend measure of colleges' financial standing, and the department releases new proposed rules on distance education.
January 7, 2019
The Education Department's proposals for upcoming negotiated rule-making process would narrow the responsibilities of accreditors and modify federal definitions for credit hour and distance education.
August 22, 2018
A Q&A with Ryan Craig, investor and author of a new book about the changing landscape for education and training credentials and the implications for traditional higher education.
August 9, 2018
A Q&A with Paul Freedman, who, unlike some of his ed-tech peers, focuses on nurturing companies that will extend the reach of traditional institutions, not compete with them.
April 28, 2017
Indiana institution acquires Kaplan University and its 32,000 students in an unprecedented move to enter online education as many large for-profits continue to slump.
February 7, 2017
Education Secretary nominee Betsy DeVos has family and likely financial connections to The College Fix, a conservative news site that often criticizes liberal bias in higher education.
January 19, 2017
Obama trumpeted importance of college-going and invested in students and institutions like no leader before him -- while demanding much in return and, sometimes, failing big, too.
September 2, 2016
Two Obama administration veterans are now advising Hillary Clinton's campaign, suggesting that as president she would continue aggressive enforcement policies of the current Education Department.
November 21, 2014
Half of Corinthian Colleges goes nonprofit, as loan guarantor ECMC will buy 56 Everest and WyoTech campuses. Critics say the purchase doesn't do nearly enough for students or to prevent conflicts of interest.
September 25, 2014
The default rate on federal loans edges down as 21 colleges face sanctions for having rates that exceed the legal threshold.

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