Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

December 8, 2016
The college completion agenda reaches an inflection point as the Obama administration ends and the nation increasingly focuses on jobs and college value. Experts assess shifts in the completion push and what comes next.
December 5, 2016
Overall national college completion rates are rising after a two-year slide, according to new data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, which tracks 97 percent of all college enrollments.
December 1, 2016
The percentage of graduating high school seniors who completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid in 2015 varied widely by city, according to a new analysis from the National College Access Network. The group looked at numbers from 68 cities, finding that a high of 68 percent completed the FAFSA in Memphis, Tenn., compared to a low of 25 percent in North Las Vegas. The 68-city average was 48 percent, according to the group, which is close to the nationwide rate of 44 percent in 2014.
December 1, 2016
Colorado Heights University, a private nonprofit institution located in Denver, will shut down next year, The Denver Post reported. The small university enrolls mostly international students.
November 30, 2016
DeRionne Pollard, president of Maryland's Montgomery College, since 2013 spent roughly $130,000 in college funds on travel, meals and entertainment, according to a report by a local NBC affiliate. The two-year college, which is located in suburban Washington, also spent $70,000 on private security for Pollard, including an armed driver.
November 30, 2016
After reaching a peak of 14 percent in 2008, the number of undergraduates nationwide who used private student loans declined by roughly half by 2012, to 6 percent, according to a new data report from the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics. During the same time period, the percentage of undergraduates borrowing from the federal government through the Stafford Loan program increased to 40 percent from 35 percent.
November 29, 2016
Udacity and some boot camps offer money-back guarantees despite state bans on job-placement promises in higher education. But some say the offers are a form of risk sharing worth considering.
November 28, 2016
Academic programs enrolling roughly 16 percent of the University of Phoenix's student population do not pass the federal government's new gainful employment rule, according to a financial filing from the Apollo Education Group, the university's owner.
November 17, 2016
Newt Gingrich and U.S. Representative Pete Sessions, a Texas Republican, are slated to join Career Education Colleges and Universities at an event Friday. The group, which is the primary trade organization for the for-profit sector, is announcing a new campaign to close the skills gap with five million trained professionals. Gingrich, the former Speaker of the U.S.
November 16, 2016
New federal numbers show that students who complete a college degree or certificate are more likely to be employed than their peers who don't. The data from the U.S. Department of Education is based on a study of 16,700 students who first enrolled in college in 2003. Those who had earned a credential by 2009 were more likely to hold employment at that time. Students who earned a degree were more likely to be employed than those who earned a certificate.

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September 2, 2016
Two Obama administration veterans are now advising Hillary Clinton's campaign, suggesting that as president she would continue aggressive enforcement policies of the current Education Department.
November 21, 2014
Half of Corinthian Colleges goes nonprofit, as loan guarantor ECMC will buy 56 Everest and WyoTech campuses. Critics say the purchase doesn't do nearly enough for students or to prevent conflicts of interest.
September 25, 2014
The default rate on federal loans edges down as 21 colleges face sanctions for having rates that exceed the legal threshold.
August 19, 2014
The messy failure of Corinthian Colleges raises questions about limitations of the Education Department's oversight of for-profit chains, and how it might tighten as other companies teeter.
May 28, 2014
As public comment period ends for the administration's "gainful employment" proposal, for-profit colleges and supporters blast the rules as an overreach; critics of the industry say proposal doesn't go far enough.
May 7, 2014
Can a for-profit industry beset by growing legal and financial woes fend off the Obama administration's second try at gainful employment rules?
December 13, 2013
As federal panel weighs fate of agency that withdrew support from City College of San Francisco, lawmakers on Capitol Hill ponder future role for the government in accreditation.
October 10, 2013
Laureate Education has quietly become an 800,000-student behemoth and a major player in global higher education. So what is the company, exactly?
September 10, 2013
Gainful employment rewrite kicks off with rule-making session, but consensus appears unlikely as negotiators are far apart on day one.
August 26, 2013
President, in direct remarks on the sector, notes concerns that some institutions "make out like a bandit," but calls for more scrutiny of colleges across the board.

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