Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

July 7, 2016
The U.S. House Appropriations Committee on Wednesday released a draft funding bill that would block implementation of federal gainful employment rules and would not back the U.S. Senate's attempt to restore year-round Pell Grant eligibility.
July 6, 2016
A growing number of colleges have created student aid programs that direct small amounts of money, sometimes as little as $300, to students who are struggling to pay for tuition or a financial emergency.
July 5, 2016
New interstate network seeks to help students transfer across state lines without losing credits, but also defers to faculty members at each college about how to measure learning.
July 5, 2016
The Democratic National Committee last Friday released a draft party platform that included no surprises on higher education.
June 29, 2016
The U.S. Department of Education has simplified and clarified the process through which homeless students can apply for federal financial aid. John King, the U.S. Secretary of Education, described changes to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and to the department's website in a letter to Senator Patty Murray, the Democrat from Washington State who had called for a more streamlined process. The U.S.
June 29, 2016
Students and their families are receiving scholarships and grants to cover more of the price of college, according to the latest installment of an annual survey conducted by Sallie Mae, the student lender. The survey of 799 undergraduates and 799 parents of college students found that scholarships and grants funded 34 percent of college expenses last year, up from 30 percent the previous year.
June 28, 2016
Slightly less than one-quarter of parents and 37 percent of students believe they will qualify for financial aid, according to the results of a survey released this week by Royall & Company, a division of the Education Advisory Board (EAB). The findings, which are based on a survey of 5,133 college-bound high school students and their parents, stand in contrast to federal data showing that 85 percent of all college-going students receive aid in the form of grants or low-interest loans from the federal government.
June 24, 2016
Federal panel recommends termination for ACICS, an accreditor of several notorious for-profits, while also tightening the screws on the American Bar Association and other agencies.
June 23, 2016
The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities on Wednesday said it backed an approach to the accreditation process where the agencies focus more time and energy on colleges that have problems than on those that don't. The U.S. Department of Education also recently has said it supports risk-based accreditation.
June 22, 2016
The University of Virginia's Miller Center and the National Commission on Financing 21st Century Higher Education this week released four new white papers that describe higher education's fiscal challenges and provide initial solutions.

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November 8, 2012
California higher education leaders see Tuesday’s election results as a potential boon for the state’s colleges and universities, but major financial problems could still complicate the systems’ recoveries.
May 15, 2012
California's governor lays out deep "trigger cuts" to higher education if a tax hike fails in November. But business leaders and one faculty union appear unlikely to back the tax plan.
April 17, 2012
The Bidens' tax return had non-tenure track instructors wondering how one of their own could be earning $82,000 a year, but it turns out Jill Biden has become an associate professor.
April 5, 2012
City Colleges of Chicago and union representing adult education instructors agree to bonus pay based on student performance.

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