Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

October 6, 2016
National accreditor ACCSC gets inquiries from nearly 300 colleges overseen by ACICS, most of them for-profits. Critics of accreditors will be watching as the agency reviews the flood of applications.
October 6, 2016
Public Agenda, a nonpartisan group, on Thursday released results of two recent national surveys of American adults on higher education. Respondents generally favor using taxpayer money to make public colleges free for students from low- and middle-income families, with roughly two-thirds calling it a good idea. However, the survey found that Democrats are much more likely to like free college proposals (86 percent) than Republicans (34 percent).
October 6, 2016
The Center for American Progress today released a report that proposes a "complementary competitor" to the current system of accreditation. The report describes three primary components for an outcomes-focused, alternative system, which, like current accreditors, would serve as a gatekeeper to federal financial aid.
October 4, 2016
As part of a broad statement on corporate regulation, the presidential campaign of Democrat Hillary Clinton on Monday criticized the use of mandatory arbitration agreements in higher education. Some colleges, primarily in the for-profit sector, require newly enrolling students to agree to settle any disputes through arbitration rather than through a legal challenge.
September 30, 2016
Guarantee agencies have fallen away from their public missions, says the Century Foundation, which called on the feds to push for the agencies’ $5 billion in assets to be spent helping struggling student borrowers.
September 30, 2016
Regency Beauty Institute closed all 79 of its campuses this week, the for-profit chain announced on its website. The Minnesota-based Regency apologized to students for the "abrupt nature" of the news.
September 29, 2016
A new report from the Century Foundation criticizes student loan guaranty agencies, arguing that they largely have abandoned their public missions. The report said the nonprofit guaranty agencies' collective $5 billion in funds could be used more productively and appropriately. Inside Higher Ed will publish a news article on the report's findings tomorrow.
September 28, 2016
More parents are saving money for college, according to the latest installment of a national survey conducted by Sallie Mae, the student lender. They're also saving more money and are more confident about their ability to pay for college, the survey found. For example, 55 percent of parents say they are confident they can meet the future price of their children's college education, up from 42 percent last year.
September 28, 2016
A federal appeals court this week overruled another court's ruling that would have allowed a merger between the Penn State Hershey Medical Center and PinnacleHealth System, a private hospital operator. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission and Pennsylvania's attorney general have opposed the merger, citing monopolistic concerns.
September 26, 2016
Military and veteran students who attend colleges that are accredited by the Accrediting Council of Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) should be able to continue receiving Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to attend those institutions, at least for another 18 months. 


March 13, 2013
California lawmaker wants MOOCs and other online providers to help meet student demand, and will encourage -- and some fear force -- public colleges to accept those credits.
November 8, 2012
California higher education leaders see Tuesday’s election results as a potential boon for the state’s colleges and universities, but major financial problems could still complicate the systems’ recoveries.
May 15, 2012
California's governor lays out deep "trigger cuts" to higher education if a tax hike fails in November. But business leaders and one faculty union appear unlikely to back the tax plan.
April 17, 2012
The Bidens' tax return had non-tenure track instructors wondering how one of their own could be earning $82,000 a year, but it turns out Jill Biden has become an associate professor.
April 5, 2012
City Colleges of Chicago and union representing adult education instructors agree to bonus pay based on student performance.


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