Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

November 6, 2015
Southern Utah University goes all in with an experiment on general education, combining 13 courses into one year of material that eight professors jointly teach.
November 4, 2015
A coalition of 12 organizations, including New America, the Business Roundtable, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Center for Law and Social Policy, on Wednesday released a set of shared principles for policy makers to consider in the run-up to the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, the law that governs federal aid programs.
November 4, 2015
The Lumina Foundation this week released the first four of 13 papers it plans to roll out in coming months on performance-based funding in higher education.
November 2, 2015
The Obama administration will help some high school students pay for college courses while still in high school by allowing limited access to Pell Grants.
October 30, 2015
The U.S. Department of Education today announced the creation of an experiment that will seek to encourage the expansion of dual-enrollment programs for students from low-income backgrounds.
October 30, 2015
Several large corporations have partnered with the GED Testing Service to allow their employees to pursue the credential -- which is the equivalent of a high-school diploma -- without having to pay any fees. The new GEDWorks program also includes free student supports, including online study materials, practice tests and access to GED advisers. Participating companies include Walmart, KFC, Taco Bell and Southeastern Grocers.
October 30, 2015
Rider University, a private institution located in New Jersey, announced this week that it will close 14 academic programs and lay off 14 full-time faculty members. The university also will convert three academic majors to minors and will eliminate two clerical positions and five vacant faculty jobs. The cuts are in response to financial challenges, the university said in a written statement, and will result in annual savings of about $2 million.
October 29, 2015
Jamie Merisotis of Lumina Foundation wrote a book on how to rethink higher education and immigration policy to fix America's talent pool problem.
October 29, 2015
The Aspen Institute and the Siemens Foundation this week announced the first results of a new partnership focused on the projected shortages of skilled workers for high-demand jobs in manufacturing, energy, health care and information technology. Community colleges are key to meeting this demand, the two groups said.
October 29, 2015
Stratford University, a for-profit institution based in Virginia, this week announced that it has become a public benefit corporation. That move, which a handful of other for-profits have made recently, is a legal change to a company's charter, which allows it to focus more on activities that do not generate a profit -- including actions that are aimed at benefiting the public.

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