Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

November 17, 2015
Westwood College, a for-profit chain with 14 campus locations, last week announced on its website that it has stopped enrolling new students. Earlier this month Westwood agreed to a $15 million settlement with the office of the Illinois attorney general, which had sued the for-profit over allegations of deceptive marketing.
November 16, 2015
A public university group is backing adaptive learning, with grants to encourage universities to use the personalized digital courseware across multiple introductory courses.
November 12, 2015
A recently announced experiment by the U.S. Department of Education will allow a handful of nontraditional providers -- including boot camps and online course providers -- to team up with accredited colleges on academic offerings that will be eligible for federal financial aid. Applicants for the program are required to bring in an outside "quality-assurance entity," which will serve as an alternative form of accreditation.
November 11, 2015
A new report from a broad, ongoing Gallup-Purdue University study of quality-of-life measures for college graduates looks at how veterans and active-duty members of the U.S. military are faring in higher education.
November 11, 2015
Many occupation-focused associate degrees and certificates are not designed to lead to bachelor's-degree pathways, according to a new policy report from New America, a think tank.
November 11, 2015
The Obama administration this week announced several new efforts it said would help veterans of the U.S. military get more out of their college educations. The White House said it was unveiling a redesigned version of a federal GI Bill Comparison Tool, drawing new data from the broader College Scorecard to give veteran-specific data on graduation and retention rates.
November 10, 2015
The Starbucks Corporation this week announced that it will offer a tuition-free education to a spouse or child of its employees who are veterans or active-duty members of the U.S. military. The benefit will be offered as part of the coffee chain's partnership with Arizona State University, which gives Starbucks employees access to a tuition-free bachelor's degree. More than 4,000 employees have enrolled in the program.
November 6, 2015
Southern Utah University goes all in with an experiment on general education, combining 13 courses into one year of material that eight professors jointly teach.
November 4, 2015
A coalition of 12 organizations, including New America, the Business Roundtable, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Center for Law and Social Policy, on Wednesday released a set of shared principles for policy makers to consider in the run-up to the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, the law that governs federal aid programs.
November 4, 2015
The Lumina Foundation this week released the first four of 13 papers it plans to roll out in coming months on performance-based funding in higher education.

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