Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

October 22, 2014
Community colleges gain traction in push to reinstate federal aid for students without a high school diploma, less so for bringing back "summer Pell."
October 21, 2014
The University of Michigan's regional accreditor has signed off on a new competency-based degree that does not rely on the credit-hour standard, the university said last week. The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools gave a green light to the proposed master's of health professions education, which the university's medical school will offer.
October 16, 2014
Brandman University this week announced that the U.S. Department of Education had approved its application to offer federal financial aid for an emerging form of competency-based education. The university is the fourth institution to get the nod from the department for "direct assessment" degrees, which are decoupled from the credit-hour standard.
October 16, 2014
The relationship between federal policy and the skills gap is misunderstood, according to a new report from the New America Foundation. The paper looks at five "policy gaps" in the Higher Education Act, the law governing federal student aid programs, that could be closed to build stronger connections between learning and work.
October 16, 2014
Momentum and criticism build for tuition-free community college plans, but even some skeptics say scholarships in Tennessee and Chicago could bring in more low-income students.
October 14, 2014
The National Student Clearinghouse on Tuesday released a broad data set on students' transition from high school to college. The nonprofit group's report, which is the second annual installment, tracked 3.5 million students from public and private high schools over four years. It found that students from low-income high schools were more likely to attend community colleges, with almost half of that group's college enrollment being in the two-year sector.
October 10, 2014
Arizona State University professor uses Smart Sparrow, an adaptive learning platform, to create an online science course with his personal vision.
October 3, 2014
Audit critical of the Education Department's review process for alternative to the credit hour raises questions about direction of federal policy and could discourage some colleges.
October 2, 2014
LinkedIn gets into college rankings with an employment outcomes tool based on big samples and plenty of specifics about real people.
October 1, 2014
Excelencia in Education, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit group that focuses on Latino student success, announced this week that it had received $2.4 million in new grants from four foundations. A spokesman for the group said three-quarters of the money is aimed at growing its capacity, as opposed to funding specific projects. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation contributed $1 million, which is the largest of the four grants.

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