Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

June 19, 2015
Up to 35 million Americans have enrolled in college at some point but failed to earn a degree or certificate. A new report from Higher Ed Insight, a research firm, tracks the challenges adult students face when they return to college. The 69-page document is an evaluation of the Lumina Foundation's adult college completion work.
June 19, 2015
Career Education Corporation, a major for-profit chain, announced Thursday that it is selling Brooks Institute to gphomestay, a company that works on international student programs at high schools and colleges in the U.S. The California-based Brooks Institute is a visual and media arts institution that offers undergraduate and master's degrees. It enrolls roughly 500 students and has campuses in Santa Barbara and Ventura.
June 18, 2015
ACT decides to drop its popular Compass placement test, with a nod toward research showing that Compass funnels too many community college students into remedial courses.
June 17, 2015
Education Department and regional accreditors seek common ground on competency-based education, including what the faculty role should be in the emerging form of higher education.
June 17, 2015
Massachusetts' nine public universities will have some of their state support tied to a funding formula based on the number of students they graduate. The state board of higher education on Tuesday voted to approve the formula and will apply $5.6 million to it in the coming fiscal year.
June 17, 2015
Excelencia in Education today released a report that lists the 25 colleges that graduate the most Latino students in science, technology, engineering and math. Using data from 2013, the nonprofit group found that 2 percent of all U.S. institutions graduate one-third of Latinos who earn STEM credentials. While the number of Latinos earning these credentials has increased, they still account for just 9 percent of STEM credentials earned.
June 12, 2015
Lumina Foundation creates a group to develop a framework and common language for the growing number of credentials, which range from degrees to alternative forms like badges and industry certifications.
June 11, 2015
Employers and community colleges team up to design new courses and alternative credentials that attempt to close the skills gap by better preparing students for jobs.
June 10, 2015
The State University of New York system will create and test a "universal diagnostic to assess and track college readiness among 10th- and 11th-grade students in diverse communities across the state," the system said this week. The pilot program will feature extra remedial support for underprepared students to help ensure they are ready for college when they graduate from high school. All participating students will have access to a forthcoming free online course from SUNY on college readiness.
June 4, 2015
Bill Gates is among a group of rich college dropouts people often cite when questioning the value of a college degree. He isn't buying that argument. “Although I dropped out of college and got lucky pursuing a career in software, getting a degree is a much surer path to success,” Gates wrote on Wednesday.

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