Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

June 4, 2015
Bill Gates is among a group of rich college dropouts people often cite when questioning the value of a college degree. He isn't buying that argument. “Although I dropped out of college and got lucky pursuing a career in software, getting a degree is a much surer path to success,” Gates wrote on Wednesday.
June 3, 2015
National University will lead a newly formed coalition of nine universities that are seeking to expand teacher development and early childhood initiatives, the San Diego-based National announced this week. The $30 million Sanford Education Collaborative will reach into more than 2,000 schools in California, Florida, Maine, New York, South Dakota and Washington.
June 2, 2015
Anthem Inc., a national health care company, announced Tuesday that its 55,000 employees can pursue a no-cost associate or bachelor's degree at College for America, a competency-based subsidiary of Southern New Hampshire University. The new benefit is available to any Anthem employee who works 20 hours or more per week and has been employed there for at least six months.
June 2, 2015
Sinclair Community College boosted student completion rates by 75 percent, but to sharpen its focus, the college began cutting some of its more than 100 completion-related projects.
May 29, 2015
Recent adaptive learning entrants seek to put faculty members in charge of "personalized" content, but will the tools go beyond pilot projects?
May 28, 2015
Only 23 percent of working-age black adults in California hold bachelor's degrees, according to a new report from the Campaign for College Opportunity, compared to 42 percent of their white counterparts. And one-third of black adults in the state attended college but earned no degree. The report also found that black undergraduates are underrepresented at four-year public and private nonprofit universities in the state. They are overrepresented at California community colleges and for-profit institutions, however.
May 28, 2015
Rural high school students in Oregon were less likely to enroll and persist in college, according to a new study from REL Northwest, a regional research group that receives funding from the U.S. Department of Education. The study tracked students in Oregon who began high school between 2005 and 2007. It found that 55 percent of rural students enrolled in college, compared to 63 percent of nonrural students.
May 26, 2015
A budget committee of Wisconsin's Legislature last week voted down a proposal by the state's Republican governor, Scott Walker, to eliminate Wisconsin's oversight board of for-profit institutions, the Wisconsin State Journal reported.
May 26, 2015
Newly introduced legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives would enable the linking of student-level enrollment information with data on employment and wages.
May 22, 2015
A group of six Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday introduced legislation that would reinstate Pell Grant eligibility for incarcerated college students. Congress in 1994 banned the use of Pell Grants by prisoners in state and federal prisons. However, the U.S.

Pages

Back to Top